John S. Morgan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
John S. Morgan
Maryland House of Delegates District 13B
In office
1991–1999
Preceded by William C. Bevan & Susan R. Buswell
Succeeded by John A. Giannetti, Jr.
Constituency Prince George's County & Howard County
Personal details
Born (1963-12-23) December 23, 1963 (age 50)
Washington, D.C.
Political party Republican
Profession Engineer

John S. Morgan was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates, representing District 13B, which covered portions of Prince George's County & Howard County Maryland. Along with fellow Republican Martin G. Madden, he helped unseat incumbent Democrat William C. Bevan from office. In 1998, he was defeated by Democrat John A. Giannetti, Jr.. It was the second time he had faced Giannetti in the general election, the first time being in 1994 when he handily defeated him.

Morgan also ran for United State Congress in 1996 against incumbent Steny Hoyer, but was defeated by 14 percentage points.

Education[edit]

Delegate Morgan graduated from Loyola College with his Bachelor of Science in physics in 1984. He later returned to school, this time attending the Whiting School at the Johns Hopkins University where he received his Master's degree in 1988 and his PhD in 1990.

Career[edit]

Prior to elected office, Delegate Morgan was a senior engineer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. From 2001 to 2010, he directed the Office of Science and Technology within the National Institute of Justice, the office in the Department of Justice responsible for the nation's development of technology for state and local law enforcement, corrections, and crime laboratories. He currently is the Command Science Advisor to the US Army Special Operations Command. He received the Service to America medal in 2007 for his work to improve the nation's capacity to use DNA evidence.

Morgan was also a Congressional Science Fellow with the American Physical Society from 1994 until 1995. He continues to be a member of the American Physical Society in addition to the Materials Research Society, the American Society for Nondestructive Testing, and the American Council of Young Political Leaders. He is a recipient of the Charles E. Miller Award and is a member of the Howard County Republican Party.

While a member of the Maryland House of Delegates, Morgan was a member of the Constitutional and Administrative Law Committee from 1991 until 1992, the Judiciary Committee in 1993 and the Commerce and Government Matters Committee from 1994 until 1999. He was also a member of the Joint Advisory Committee on Legislative Data Systems from 1993 until 1999, the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics from 1995 until 1999, and a member of the bi-County Committee for the Prince George's County Delegation.

Election results[edit]

  • 1998 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 13B[1]
Voters to choose one:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
John A. Giannetti, Jr., Dem. 4,950   58%    Won
John S. Morgan, Rep. 3,512   42%    Lost
  • 1996 Race for U.S. Congress – District 5[2]
Voters to choose one:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Steny H. Hoyer, Dem. 121,288   57%    Won
John S. Morgan, Rep. 91,806   43%    Lost
  • 1994 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 13B[3]
Voters to choose one:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
John S. Morgan, Rep. 4,167   57%    Won
John A. Giannetti, Jr., Dem. 3,101   43%    Lost
  • 1990 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 13B[4]
Voters to choose two:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Martin G. Madden, Rep. 11,112   31%    Won
John S. Morgan, Rep. 9,108   25%    Won
Robert J. DiPietro, Dem. 7,864   22%    Lost
William C. Bevan, Dem. 7,772   22%    Lost

References and notes[edit]

  1. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Jan, 25th, 2008
  2. ^ "United States Congress Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Jan, 25th, 2008
  3. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Jan, 25th, 2008
  4. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Jan, 25th, 2008

See also[edit]