John Smith (Platonist)

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John Smith (born 1618 in Achurch, Northamptonshire — died August 7,[1] 1652 in Cambridge) was an English philosopher, theologian, and educator.

Life[edit]

He entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1636, took his B.A. in 1640 and his M.A. in 1644, at which time he was chosen fellow of Queens' College.[2] His health seems to have been precarious from the first. His labors were principally confined to his office as teacher, for which he had remarkable qualifications. His preaching was with a rare degree of eloquence, which can still be felt in the Select Discourses (1660). In that work, he writes about several metaphysical and epistemological issues surrounding Christianity — the existence of God, eternal life, and rationality. He gained much local fame as a lecturer on mathematics. His personal character was such as to excite the admiration of his associates in a remarkable degree. As a "founder" of the Cambridge Platonists, his special service was in developing the foundation of a Christian philosophy that was deeply rational, open to the new science, and yet directed to the practical goal of living a religious life.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rufus M. Jones, Spiritual Reformers in the 16th and 17th Centuries (1998), p. 306.
  2. ^ "Smith, John (SMT636J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 

External links[edit]

Works[edit]

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