John Smith (Vermont)

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John Smith
John Smith (Vermont).jpg
Member of the
United States House of Representatives
from Vermont's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1839 – March 3, 1841
Preceded by Heman Allen (of Milton)
Succeeded by Augustus Young (representative)
1st
Personal details
Born (1789-08-12)August 12, 1789
Barre, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died August 26, 1858(1858-08-26) (aged 69)
St. Albans, Vermont, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Maria W. Curtis Smith[1]
Children Harriet Maria Smith, J. Gregory Smith, Edward Curtis Smith, Worthington Curtis Smith, Julia Pierpont Smith, Francis Curtis Smith and Louisa Ten Broeck Smith.[2]
Alma mater University of Vermont
Profession Politician, Lawyer

John Smith (August 12, 1789 - November 26, 1858) was an American lawyer and politician from Vermont. He served as a U.S. Representative.

Biography[edit]

Smith was born in Barre, Massachusetts[3] to Deacon Samuel Smith and Patience Gregory Smith. He attended the common schools, and moved to St. Albans where he read law. He was admitted to the bar in 1810 and began the practice of law in St. Albans. He formed a law partnership with Benjamin Swift.

He was State's Attorney for Franklin County from 1826 until 1832.Smith was a member of the Vermont House of Representatives from 1827 until 1837, and served as Speaker from 1831 until 1833.[4]

He was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-sixth Congress, serving from March 4, 1839 until March 3, 1841.[5] He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1840 to the Twenty-seventh Congress.

While in Congress, Smith delivered the speech, "“The Defense of the Independent Treasury Idea", which gained national attention and was considered one of the best speeches on this subject.[6] Smith received an honorary Master of Arts degree from the University of Vermont.[7]

After leaving Congress, Smith became involved in railroad enterprises and helped establish the Vermont and Canada Railroad.[8]

Family[edit]

John Smith married Maria Waitstell Curtis in 1814. Their children included Harriet Maria, J. Gregory, Edward Curtis, Worthington Curtis, Julia Pierpont, Francis Curtis, and Louisa Jen Broeck.[9][10][11]

He was the grandfather of Edward Curtis Smith. In addition, his family was related by marriage to those of Lawrence Brainerd, Amaziah Bailey James and F. Stewart Stranahan.

Death[edit]

Smith died on November 26, 1858 in St. Albans, Vermont. He in interred at Greenwood Cemetery in St. Albans.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Biography of John Smith". History 50 States. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Smith Family Papers". The University of Vermont Libraries. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Smith, John (1789-1858)". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  4. ^ "SMITH, John, (1789 - 1858)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Rep. John Smith". Govtrack.us. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  6. ^ Carleton, Hiram (1903). Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume 2. Lewis Publishing Company. p. 53. 
  7. ^ "Smith Family Papers". The University of Vermont Libraries. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  8. ^ "The Biography of John Smith". History 50 States. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Smith Family Papers". The University of Vermont Libraries. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Smith, Worthington Curtis (1823-1894)". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  11. ^ "The Biography of John Smith". History 50 States. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  12. ^ "John Smith". Find A Grave. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

  • "Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume 2" by Hiram Carleton, published by Lewis Publishing Company, 1903.

External links[edit]


Political offices
Preceded by
Robert B. Bates
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives
1831–1834
Succeeded by
Ebenezer N. Briggs