John Ulrich Giesy

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John Ulrich Giesy
Born August 6, 1877
Chillicothe, Ohio, United States
Died September 8, 1947(1947-09-08) (aged 70)
Salt Lake City, Utah, US
Occupation Physician, writer
Nationality American
Period 1912–1924
Genre Speculative fiction

John Ulrich Giesy (J.U. Giesy) born August 6, 1877 near Chillicothe,[1] Ross County, Ohio,[2] USA, died September 8, 1947 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA,[2] was an American physician, novelist and author. He was one of the early writers in the Sword and Planet genre, with his Jason Croft series.[3] He collaborated with Junius B. Smith on many of his stories.

Career[edit]

Robert Weinberg's website described the series of stories starring Jason Croft as "[o]ne of the most popular scientific romance trilogies published in All-Story Weekly magazine of the first quarter of the 20th century."[4] Giesy also wrote for other pulp magazines such as Argosy, Adventure and Weird Tales. Giesy's 1915 novel All For His Country is a story of a future invasion of the US by the Japanese.[5] Because All For His Country depicts Japanese-Americans living in California helping the invasion, some critics have cited it as an example of the anti-Japanese racism that ultimately resulted in the Internment of Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor.[6]

Giesy lived in Salt Lake City where he met Junius B. Smith, with whom he co-authored a large number of stories, including those featuring the occult detective Semi-Dual.

Bibliography[edit]

Giesy's Jason Croft novels received serial publication in All-Story magazines before their release in book form.

The Jason Croft series[edit]

  1. Palos of the Dog Star Pack (All-Story Magazine, July–August 1918)
  2. The Mouthpiece of Zitu (1919)
  3. Jason, Son of Jason (1921)

Semi-Dual[edit]

The Semi-Dual series includes:[7]

  • "The Occult Detector" (The Cavalier, February–March 1912)
  • "House of Invisible Bondage" (All-Story Weekly, 1926)
  • "Black and White" (1920)
  • "The Black Butterfly" (1918)
  • "Box 991" (1916)
  • "The Curse of Quetzal" (1914)
  • "The Compass in the Sky" (People's Magazine May 1917)
  • "The Ghost of a Name" (The Cavalier December 20, 1913)
  • "The Green Goddess" (Argosy Jan 31, Feb 7, Feb 14, February 21, 1931)
  • "The House of the Ego" The Cavalier Sep 20, Sep 27, October 4, 1913
  • "House of the Hundred Lights" All-Story Weekly May 22, May 29, 1920
  • "The Ivory Pipe" All-Story Weekly Sep 20, Sep 27, October 4, 1919
  • "The Killer" All-Story Weekly Apr 7, April 14, 1917
  • "The Ledger of Life" (1934)
  • "The Master Mind" The Cavalier January 25, 1913
  • "The Opposing Venus" (1923)
  • "Poor Little Pigeon" (1924)
  • "The Purple Light" The Cavalier Oct 5, Oct 12, October 19, 1912
  • "Rubies of Doom" The Cavalier Jul 5, July 12, 1913
  • "The Significance of the High "D”" The Cavalier Mar 9, Mar 16, March 23, 1912
  • "Snared" All-Story Weekly Dec 18, December 25, 1915
  • "Solomon's Decision" (1917)
  • "The Stars Were Looking" Top-Notch July 1, 1918
  • "Stars of Evil" (1919)
  • "The Storehouse of Past Events" People's Favorite Magazine February 10, 1918
  • "The Unknown Quantity" All-Story Weekly Aug 25, Sep 1, September 8, 1917
  • "The Web of Circumstance" All Around Magazine Nov 1916
  • "The Web of Destiny" (1915)
  • "The Wistaria Scarf" The Cavalier Jun 1, Jun 8, June 15, 1912
  • "The Wolf of Erlik" (1921)
  • "The Woolly Dog" Argosy All-Story Weekly March 23, 1929

Professor Zapt[edit]

  • "Indegestible Dog Biscuits" (1915)
  • "Blind Man's Buff" (1920)
  • "Zapt's Repulsive Paste" (1919)
  • "The Wicked Flea" (1925)

Other novels and stories[edit]

  • All for His Country (1915)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Science Fiction/Fantasy Authors of Various Faiths". Retrieved September 8, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Dr John Ulrich GIESY". Our Family History and Ancestry. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  3. ^ Westfahl 2000, p. 39.
  4. ^ Weinberg, Robert. "Editing". Retrieved September 8, 2011. 
  5. ^ Westfahl 2000, p. 153
  6. ^ Sharp 2007, pp. 108–112.
  7. ^ Semi-Dual at the FictionMags Index

References[edit]

External links[edit]