John V, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg

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John V
Coat of Arms of John V, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg.jpg
Woodcut by Lucas Cranach the Elder: Coat-of-arms of John V
Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg
Reign 1439 – 1507
Predecessor Bernard II
Successor Magnus I
Consort Dorothea of Brandenburg
Issue
more...
Magnus I
Eric II/I
John IV, Prince-Bishop of Hildesheim
House House of Ascania
Father Bernard II
Mother Adelheid of Pomerania-Stolp
Born (1439-07-18)18 July 1439
Died 15 August 1507(1507-08-15) (aged 68)
Religion Roman Catholic

John V of Saxe-Lauenburg (also numbered John IV;[1] 18 July 1439 – 15 August 1507) was the eldest son of Duke Bernard II of Saxe-Lauenburg and Adelheid of Pomerania-Stolp (*1410 – after 1445*), daughter of Duke Bogislaus VIII of Pomerania-Stolp. He succeeded his father in 1463 as duke of Saxe-Lauenburg.

Life[edit]

The ducal residential castle in Lauenburg upon Elbe.

After a fire John V reconstructed Saxe-Lauenburg's residential castle in Lauenburg upon Elbe, started in 1180–1182 by Duke Bernard I.[2]

In 1481 John V redeemed Saxe-Lauenburg's exclave Land of Hadeln, which had been pawned to Hamburg as security for a credit of 3,000 Rhenish guilders since 1407.[3] John V then made his son and heir apparent, Magnus, vicegerent of Hadeln, and finally regent as of 1498.[4]

Having advanced to regent Magnus, who in 1484 had failed to conquer the rich Land of Wursten, a de facto autonomous region of free Frisian peasants in a North Sea marsh at the Weser estuary, won his father and Henry IV the Elder of Brunswick and Lunenburg, Prince of Wolfenbüttel on 24 November 1498 as allies in a second attempt to conquer Wursten.[5][6] However, on 9 September 1499 the pre-emptive feud of the joint forces of Wursten, the Prince-Archbishopric of Bremen, Ditmarsh, the cities of Bremen, Buxtehude, Hamburg, and Stade against John V and Magnus turned the latter's campaign into an adventure involving heavy losses.[4] By early December 1499 Prince-Archbishop Johann Rode of Bremen converted Henry IV to their column so that Magnus lacked support.[7]

Mediated by Eric I of Brunswick and Lunenburg, Prince of Calenberg and Henry IV, Rode and Magnus for his father John V concluded peace on 20 January 1500.[7] Hadeln was restored to Magnus, while the Wursteners rendered homage to Rode on 18 August, thus in the end little had changed as compared with the status quo ante.[8]

Marriage and issue[edit]

On 12 February 1464 John V married Dorothea of Brandenburg (1446 – March 1519), daughter of Frederick II, Elector of Brandenburg, and they had the following children:

One of John V's illegitimate children was:

References[edit]

  • Elke Freifrau von Boeselager, „Das Land Hadeln bis zum Beginn der frühen Neuzeit", in: Geschichte des Landes zwischen Elbe und Weser: 3 vols., Hans-Eckhard Dannenberg und Heinz-Joachim Schulze (eds.), Stade: Landschaftsverband der ehem. Herzogtümer Bremen und Verden, 1995 and 2008, vol. I 'Vor- und Frühgeschichte' (1995), vol. II 'Mittelalter (einschl. Kunstgeschichte)' (1995), vol. III 'Neuzeit (2008)', (=Schriftenreihe des Landschaftsverbandes der ehem. Herzogtümer Bremen und Verden; vols. 7–9), ISBN (vol. I) ISBN 978-3-9801919-7-5, (vol. II) ISBN 978-3-9801919-8-2, (vol. III) ISBN 978-3-9801919-9-9, vol. II: pp. 321-388.
  • Cordula Bornefeld, "Die Herzöge von Sachsen-Lauenburg", in: Die Fürsten des Landes: Herzöge und Grafen von Schleswig, Holstein und Lauenburg [De slevigske hertuger; German], Carsten Porskrog Rasmussen (ed.) on behalf of the Gesellschaft für Schleswig-Holsteinische Geschichte, Neumünster: Wachholtz, 2008, pp. 373-389. ISBN 978-3-529-02606-5
  • Karl Ernst Hermann Krause (1881), "Johann III. (Erzbischof von Bremen)", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German) 14, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 183–185 
  • Michael Schütz, "Die Konsolidierung des Erzstiftes unter Johann Rode", in: Geschichte des Landes zwischen Elbe und Weser: 3 vols., Hans-Eckhard Dannenberg and Heinz-Joachim Schulze (eds.), Stade: Landschaftsverband der ehem. Herzogtümer Bremen und Verden, 1995 and 2008, vol. I 'Vor- und Frühgeschichte' (1995), vol. II 'Mittelalter (einschl. Kunstgeschichte)' (1995), vol. III 'Neuzeit (2008)', (=Schriftenreihe des Landschaftsverbandes der ehem. Herzogtümer Bremen und Verden; vols. 7–9), ISBN (vol. I) ISBN 978-3-9801919-7-5, (vol. II) ISBN 978-3-9801919-8-2, (vol. III) ISBN 978-3-9801919-9-9, vol. II: pp. 263–278.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Some genealogies do not list and count John V's uncle John IV, since he was only a co-ruling duke and died without children. So when John V is counted as IV then he is often confused with his son John IV, prince-bishop of Hildesheim of that name.
  2. ^ Cordula Bornefeld, "Die Herzöge von Sachsen-Lauenburg", in: see references for bibliographical details, pp. 373-389, here p. 383. ISBN 978-3-529-02606-5
  3. ^ Elke Freifrau von Boeselager, "Das Land Hadeln bis zum Beginn der frühen Neuzeit", in: see references for bibliographical details, vol. II 'Mittelalter (einschl. Kunstgeschichte)' (1995): pp. 321-388, here p. 331. ISBN 978-3-9801919-8-2.
  4. ^ a b Elke Freifrau von Boeselager, "Das Land Hadeln bis zum Beginn der frühen Neuzeit", in: see references for bibliographical details, vol. II 'Mittelalter (einschl. Kunstgeschichte)' (1995): pp. 321-388, here p. 332. ISBN 978-3-9801919-8-2.
  5. ^ Karl Ernst Hermann Krause, "Johann III., Erzbischof von Bremen", in: see references for bibliographical details, vol. 14, pp. 183–185, here p. 184.
  6. ^ Michael Schütz, "Die Konsolidierung des Erzstiftes unter Johann Rode", in: see references for bibliographical details, vol. II: pp. 263–278, here pp. 266seq. ISBN 978-3-9801919-8-2.
  7. ^ a b Michael Schütz, "Die Konsolidierung des Erzstiftes unter Johann Rode", in: see references for bibliographical details, vol. II: pp. 263–278, here p. 268. ISBN 978-3-9801919-8-2.
  8. ^ Michael Schütz, "Die Konsolidierung des Erzstiftes unter Johann Rode", in: see references for bibliographical details, vol. II: pp. 263–278, here p. 269. ISBN 978-3-9801919-8-2.

Ancestry[edit]

John V, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg
Born: 18 July 1439 Died: 15 August 1507
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Bernard II
Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg
1439–1507
Succeeded by
Magnus I