John W. Baldwin

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John Wesley Baldwin (born July 13, 1929) is an American historian. He is Charles Homer Haskins professor of history emeritus at the Johns Hopkins University. Born in Chicago, he received his Hopkins Ph.D. in 1956 and joined the faculty in 1961. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1992.[1] Author of nine books, he has been elected to numerous academies including the American Philosophical Society, the Medieval Academy, the British Academy, the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, and, most famously, the Académie des inscriptions et belles lettres. In 2007 Northwestern University conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. He has been decorated by the French Government with the Ordre National de la Légion d'Honneur and the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. For an autobiographical sketch see "A Medievalist and Francophile Despite Himself," in Why France? American Historians Reflect on an Enduring Fascination, edited by Laura Lee Downs and Stéphan Gerson (Cornell University Press, 2007), French translation in Pourquoi la France? (Seul, 2007).

Books by John Baldwin[edit]

  • Medieval Theories of the Just Price. Romanists, Canonists and Theologians in the twelfth and thirteen centuries (Philadelphia: Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 1959)
  • Masters, Princes, and Merchants; the Social Views of Peter the Chanter & his Circle (Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press, 1970), 2 vol.
  • The Scholastic Culture of the Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (Lexington: Heath, 1971)
  • Universities in Politics; Case Studies from the Late Middle Ages and Early Modern period. Edited with Richard A. Goldthwaite (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 1972)
  • The Government of Philip Augustus: Foundations of French Royal Power in the Middle Ages (Berkeley: University of California, 19860, French translation (Paris, Fayard, 1991).
  • Les registres de Philippe Auguste (Paris :Imprimerie nationale, 1992)
  • The Language of Sex: Five Voices from Northern France around 1200 (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1996), French translation (Paris, Fayard, 1997)
  • Aristocratic Life in Medieval France: The Romances of Jean Renart and Gerbert de Montreuil, 1190–1230. (Baltimore: Johns Hoplkins, 2000)
  • Paris, 1200 (Paris: Flammarion, 2006), American edition (Stanford University Press, 2010)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Book of Members, 1780-2010: Chapter B". American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 

External links[edit]