John W. Miles

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John W. Miles
Photo-JohnWMiles.jpg
Born (1920-12-01)1 December 1920
Cincinnati, Ohio
Died 20 October 2008(2008-10-20) (aged 87)
Santa Barbara, California
Residence La Jolla, California
Fields Fluid mechanics
Institutions Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation
UCLA (1945–1961)
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego (1964–2008)
Alma mater California Institute of Technology
Doctoral students Herbert Huppert
Known for wind-wave growth model
Notable awards Timoshenko Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1982)
Otto Laporte Award (1983)

John Wilder Miles (December 1, 1920 – October 20, 2008) was a research professor emeritus of applied mechanics and geophysics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. He was well regarded for his pioneering work in theoretical fluid mechanics, and made fundamental contributions to understanding how wind energy transfers to waves.[1]

Career[edit]

The first 20 years of Miles' research was devoted to electrical and aeronautical engineering. He turned his mathematical abilities to geophysical fluid dynamics when he joined Scripps, and made numerous contributions to all aspects of fluid dynamics, including supersonic flow, ocean tides, the stability of currents and water waves and their nonlinear interactions, as well as extensive work in the application of mathematical methods.

Throughout his career, he wrote more than 400 publications. He has the unique distinction of being the only fluid mechanics researcher to have published more than hundred scientific research articles (117) in the elite and prestigious Journal of Fluid Mechanics.[2]

A postdoctoral fellowship has been established in his honor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. [3]

Selected publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Obituary Notice: Distinguished Scientist and Professor: John W. Miles". Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Retrieved 2010-03-12. 
  2. ^ 50 Years of Impact of the JFM. [1], Retrieved on 04 April 2014.
  3. ^ IGPP Scholarships [2], Retrieved on 15 October 2014.

<http://www.princeton.edu/mae/people/faculty/brown/gbdocs/jfm50.pdf>

External links[edit]