John William Nicholson

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John William Nicholson
Born (1881-11-01)1 November 1881
Darlington, Great Britain
Died 3 October 1955(1955-10-03) (aged 73)
Residence Great Britain
Nationality Great Britain
Fields Mathematician
Notable awards

John William Nicholson, FRS[1] (1 November 1881 – 3 October 1955) was an English mathematician.

Career[edit]

Based on the results of astronomical spectroscopy of nebula he proposed in 1911 the existence of several yet undiscovered elements. Coronium with an atomic weight of 0.51282, nebulium with a weight of 1.6281 and protofluorine with a weight of 2.361.[1] Ira Sprague Bowen was able to attribute the spectroscopical lines of nebulium to doubly ionized oxygen making the new elements obsolete for their explanation.[2]

Awards and honours[edit]

Nicholson was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1917.[1] In 1919, Nicholson won the Adams Prize.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Wilson, W. (1956). "John William Nicholson 1881-1955". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society 2: 209. doi:10.1098/rsbm.1956.0014. JSTOR 769485. 
  2. ^ Bowen, I. S. (1927). "The Origin of the Nebulium Spectrum". Nature 120 (3022): 473. doi:10.1038/120473a0.