John Y. Barlow

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John Y. Barlow
Mormon fundamentalists priesthood council.jpg
The priesthood council with
John Yeates Barlow (lower left)
Senior Member of the Priesthood Council
(Short Creek Community)[1]
March 16, 1935 (1935-03-16) – December 29, 1949 (1949-12-29)
Predecessor J. Leslie Broadbent
Successor Joseph White Musser
Personal details
Born John Yeates Barlow
(1874-03-04)March 4, 1874
Panaca, Nevada, United States
Died December 29, 1949(1949-12-29) (aged 75)
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Resting place Bountiful Memorial Park
40°52′02″N 111°53′15″W / 40.8672°N 111.8874°W / 40.8672; -111.8874 (Bountiful Memorial Park)
Spouse Ida M. Critchlow
Susannah S. Taggart
Ada Marriott
Martha Jessop
Parents Israel Barlow
Hannah Yeates

John Yeates Barlow (also known as John Yates Barlow) (March 4, 1874 – December 29, 1949) was a Mormon fundamentalist leader in Short Creek, Arizona.

Childhood[edit]

Barlow was born in Panaca, Lincoln County, Nevada, to Israel Barlow and his English-born wife Hannah Yeates.[2] He grew up on his father's farm in Davis County, Utah.

Polygamous marriages[edit]

Barlow married for the first time in 1897. He took his first plural wife in 1902, the second in 1918, and the third in 1923 making a total of four wives (including his first legal wife).[3] While serving as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Barlow defended his polygamous views and was dishonorably released.[4] Later, LDS Church apostle Melvin J. Ballard, the president of the Northwest States Mission during Barlow's service there, served as witness in the disciplinary council that resulted in Barlow's excommunication.[5]

As a member of the Council of Friends, Barlow was involved in the succession conflict following J. Leslie Broadbent's's death. Elden Kingston claimed that Broadbent had ordained him as "Second Elder" of the Council of Friends.[6] Kingston, along with his father, Charles W. Kingston, would separate from the main Short Creek Community and create the Davis County Cooperative Society and the Latter Day Church of Christ.

Due to Barlow's seniority in the Council of Friends and his assertion that he was "Second Elder" under Broadbent, he was mostly accepted by the Short Creek community. He led the community until his death.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hales, Brian C. "J. Leslie Broadbent". mormonfundamentalism.com. Retrieved 18 March 2014. 
  2. ^ 1880 census, Davis Co., Utah, T9-1336, p. 303D
  3. ^ Musser Journals, 19 March 1935
  4. ^ Morris Q. Kunz, Reminiscences on Priesthood, 21
  5. ^ LSJ Sermons 1:61
  6. ^ Kelsch, Louis Alma Kelsch, 46-47
  7. ^ Hales, Brian C. "John Yates Barlow". mormonfundamentalism.com. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 

External links[edit]

Mormon fundamentalist titles
Preceded by
J. Leslie Broadbent
Senior Member of the Priesthood Council
(Short Creek Community)

March 16, 1935 - December 29, 1949
Succeeded by
Joseph White Musser