Johnny Griffith (coach)

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To be distinguished from John G. Griffith or John L. Griffith.
Johnny Griffith
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1924-05-27)May 27, 1924
Crawfordville, Georgia
Died April 28, 2003(2003-04-28) (aged 78)
Duluth, Georgia
Playing career
1946 Georgia
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1949
1950–1954
1956–1960
1961–1963
1964–1966
South Georgia (assistant)
South Georgia
Georgia (assistant)
Georgia
Georgia Tech (assistant)
Head coaching record
Overall 10–16–4 (college)
32–6 (junior college)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
Georgia Sports Hall of Fame (1997)

Johnny Griffith (May 27, 1924 – April 28, 2003) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at South Georgia College (1950–1954) and the University of Georgia (1961–1963).

Early life and playing career[edit]

Griffith was born in Crawfordville, Georgia, but played high school football at Boy’s High in Atlanta, Georgia. He lettered at the University of Georgia in 1946 and was on the Bulldogs' national championship team. He also played junior college football at South Georgia College. Griffith graduated from Georgia in 1950.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

Griffith's coaching career began at the junior college level at South Georgia College in Douglas, Georgia. He was an assistant there in 1949 before becoming the head coach in 1950. In four years as the head football coach at South Georgia College, Griffith compiled a 32–6 record and took his team to four bowl appearances.

Griffith's coaching career with the Georgia Bulldogs began in 1956, when he became an assistant under head coach Wally Butts. He replaced Butts as head coach in 1961. Except for an Southeastern Conference championship in 1959, the Georgia Bulldogs struggled in the last few years under Butts. Things did not get any better under Griffith and he was only able to compile a 10–16–4 record during his three-year term as head coach. While there were few successes during this time as head coach, he did have two big victories, a 30–21 upset win over Auburn in 1962 and a 31–14 win over heavily favored Miami in 1963. Griffith was replaced after the 1963 season by Vince Dooley.

While coaching at Georgia, Griffith became embroiled in the controversy created when the Saturday Evening Post ran an article alleging that Wally Butts and Bear Bryant had conspired to fix games. The focus of the Post story was Georgia's 35–0 loss to Alabama and Griffith was quoted in the article as "bitterly" saying, "I never had a chance, did I" after the game. Butts sued the Post and Butts, Griffith and Bear Bryant all testified. Griffith denied that he made the statement attributed to him and otherwise called the facts of the Post story into question. Butts and Bryant also vehemently denied the truth of the story. Butts eventually won the case.

After Georgia, Griffith did some assistant coaching at Georgia Tech under Bobby Dodd, coaching quarterback Kim King, among others. He also became a key figure in the development of the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame and was inducted into the Hall in 1997 as a contributor. Griffith died on April 28, 2003, in Duluth, Georgia.

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Georgia Bulldogs (Southeastern Conference) (1961–1963)
1961 Georgia 3–7 2–5 9th
1962 Georgia 3–4–3 2–3–1 T–7th
1963 Georgia 4–5–1 2–4 9th
Georgia: 10–16–4 6–12–1
Total: 10–16–4

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith, Loran (April 29, 2003). "Former coach Griffith always was gentleman". Athens Banner-Herald. Morris Communications. Retrieved 2008-04-05. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]