Johnson Doctrine

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The Johnson Doctrine, enunciated by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson after the United States' intervention in the Dominican Republic in 1965,[1] declared that domestic revolution in the Western Hemisphere would no longer be a local matter when "the object is the establishment of a Communist dictatorship".[2] It is an extension of the Eisenhower and Kennedy Doctrines.

In practice, the Johnson Doctrine was used as a pretext to oppose democracy movements in Latin America in favor of right-wing military dictatorships.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ * Peters,Gerhard; Woolley, John T. "Lyndon B. Johnson: "Statement by the President Upon Ordering Troops Into the Dominican Republic.," April 28, 1965". The American Presidency Project. University of California - Santa Barbara. 
  2. ^ Peters,Gerhard; Woolley, John T. "Lyndon B. Johnson: "Radio and Television Report to the American People on the Situation in the Dominican Republic.," May 2, 1965". The American Presidency Project. University of California - Santa Barbara. 

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