Joint Forces Command

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The United Kingdom Joint Forces Command (JFC) manages allocated joint capabilities from the three armed services. Its second Commander is General Sir Richard Barrons, who took up his new position in April 2013 in succession to Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach. Barrons reports directly to the Chief of the Defence Staff.[1][dead link] The Command achieved Initial Operating Capability on 2 April 2012, having been set up following the Levene Report into Defence Reform published in June 2011.[2] It reached Full Operating Capability in April 2013.[3]

Components[edit]

JFC's Northwood HQ staff is just 150 personnel.[1][dead link] On 2 April 2012, the following organisations transferred to the Joint Forces Command, giving JFC a total of some 30,000 military and civil personnel:

  • The Permanent Joint Headquarters (known as PJHQ)
  • The Permanent Joint Operating Bases in Gibraltar, Cyprus, British Indian Ocean Territory and South Atlantic Islands
  • The Joint Force Headquarters
  • The Joint Force Logistics Component
  • The Joint Counter-Terrorist Training and Advisory Team
  • The Directorate of Special Forces
  • The Defence Academy
  • The Development Concepts and Doctrine Centre
  • Defence Intelligence
  • Surgeon-General's Headquarters and the Joint Medical Command
  • The Joint Arms Control Implementation Group
  • The Defence Centre of Training Support
  • The Defence Cyber Operations Group

External links[edit]

References[edit]