Jonathan Capehart

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Jonathan Capehart
Born July 2, 1967[1][2]
Alma mater Carleton College
Occupation Journalist
Employer The Washington Post
Awards

Jonathan T. Capehart is an American journalist and television personality. He writes for The Washington Post's PostPartisan blog and is a contributor for MSNBC.[3]

Background[edit]

Capehart grew up in New Jersey, and attended Saint Benedict's Preparatory School.[4] He is a graduate of Carleton College.[5][6]

Career[edit]

Prior to his work with the Washington Post and MSNBC, Capehart was a researcher for NBC's The Today Show.[4][7] Subsequently, he worked for the New York Daily News (NYDN), serving as a member of its editorial board from 1993 to 2000. At the time of his hiring, Capehart was youngest-ever member of that newspaper's editorial board.[4] In 2000, he left the NYDN to work at Bloomberg News and afterward, he advised and wrote speeches for Michael Bloomberg during Bloomberg's 2001 run for the mayoralty of New York City.[8][9][10] In 2002, he returned to the NYDN, serving as deputy editor of the editorial page until 2004.[8] In December 2004, Capehart joined the global public relations company Hill & Knowlton as a Senior Vice President and senior counselor of public affairs.[4]

He joined the staff of the Washington Post as a journalist and editorial board member in 2007.[11] He currently serves in that capacity, in addition to being a contributing commentator for MSNBC.[6]

In 2013, Capehart refused to comment on a race discrimination lawsuit against the Washington Post that was uncovered by journalist Evan Gahr.[12] Gahr labeled Capehart one of the Washington Post-MSNBC fixtures who regularly accuse Republicans and conservatives of racism but were "suddenly quieter than deaf mutes about a lawsuit alleging race discrimination at their own paper." [13]

Awards[edit]

Capehart was a key contributor to a New York Daily News editorial team that won a Pulitzer Prize in 1999 for Best Editorial Writing. The award was for a series of editorials regarding Harlem's Apollo Theater.[4][7]

He was a 2011 Esteem Honoree, a distinction given to individuals in recognition of efforts in supporting the African American and LGBT communities in the areas of entertainment, media, civil rights, business and art.[11]

References[edit]