Jonathan Franklin

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Jonathan Franklin (born 6 September 1964) is an investigative journalist and TV commentator on Latin American politics and news.[1] Franklin was born in Manchester, New Hampshire, and raised in Lincoln, Massachusetts, where he graduated from Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School.

Franklin attended Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, from 1983–1988 and then worked as a news clerk at The New York Times in Manhattan. From 1990 to 1995 Franklin lived in San Francisco and worked as a reporter for the San Francisco Bay Guardian and SF Weekly as well as The Boston Globe.

As a reporter for Playboy magazine in the early 1990s, Franklin interviewed prominent figures in the United States, including Patrick Buchanan and Timothy McVeigh.

Since 1995 Franklin has lived and worked in South America, with a base in Santiago, Chile. His work is regularly published by Playboy, GQ, Esquire, Marie Claire and hundreds of other magazines around the world. He currently lives in Santiago with his wife Toty Garfe and his seven daughters - Francisca, Susan, Maciel, Kimberly, Amy, Zoe and Akira.

Jonathan is the Chile correspondent for The Guardian newspaper.[2]

Franklin is also co-founder of www.addictvillage.com, a news and media agency based in Chile. Through Addictvillage Jonathan has written adventure news stories from Latin America, about topics ranging from U.S deportation of illegal immigrants[3] to hidden cocaine labs in the Colombian jungle[4] to "eco barons" in Chile.[5]

In October 2010 Franklin secured a book deal to write 33 Men, the definitive account of the Chilean miners, a non fiction book about the experience of the miners in the 2010 Copiapó mining accident. He reported extensively from the San Jose mine for The Guardian and The Washington Post. Franklin's experiences and insider accounts became the basis of a 60 Minutes TV program about the miners, an article in People magazine, a series of audio lectures on the BBC and multiple articles around the world. Franklin says, "While 2,000 journalists were locked behind police lines, my 'Rescue Team' pass enabled me to experience up close the final six weeks of this miracle rescue. It was my honor to watch the drama unfold in its many moments of beauty and courage and comedy; and to see, first-hand, the profound unity that made this operation succeed."[6]

The book has now been translated into 19 languages and was briefly a best seller in both the United States and England. For more information see the journalist´s webpage at his name com - i.e. www.jonathanfranklin.com

Currently Franklin is working in South America on stories ranging from Corruption in Brazilian football to travel stories in Colombia.

His latest articles can be read here http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/05/17/is-obama-the-new-nixon/

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