Jordi Arrese

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Jordi Arrese
Country  Spain
Residence Barcelona, Spain
Born (1964-08-29) August 29, 1964 (age 50)
Barcelona, Spain
Height 5'9" (175 cm)
Turned pro 1982
Retired 1998
Plays Right-handed (1-handed backhand)
Prize money $1,847,136
Singles
Career record 224-210
Career titles 6
Highest ranking No. 23 (November 4, 1991)
Grand Slam Singles results
French Open 3R (1985, 1987)
Wimbledon 1R (1991)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games Silver medal.svg Silver Medal (1992)
Doubles
Career record 83-112
Career titles 4
Highest ranking No. 62 (August 14, 1995)
Last updated on: August 29, 2012.
Olympic medal record
Men's tennis
Silver 1992 Barcelona Singles
This is a Catalan name. The first family name is Arrese and the second is Castañé .

Jordi Arrese i Castañé (Catalan pronunciation: [ˈʒɔrði əˈrezə j kəstəˈɲe]; born August 29, 1964) is a former professional tennis player from Spain.

Born in Barcelona, Arrese won the men's singles silver medal at the 1992 Olympic Games in his home town of Barcelona. In the final, he was defeated in a marathon five-set match by Marc Rosset of Switzerland, 7–6, 6–4, 3–6, 4–6, 8–6.

During his career, Arrese won six top-level singles and four tour doubles titles, and reached a career-high singles ranking of world no. 23. His career prize-money earnings totaled $1,847,136.

Singles finals 12 (6-6)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 1989 Madrid, Spain Clay Argentina Martín Jaite 3–6, 2–6
Winner 1. 1990 Sanremo, Italy Clay Spain Juan Aguilera 6–2, 6–2
Winner 2. 1990 Prague, Czechoslovakia Clay Sweden Nicklas Kulti 7–6(7–3), 7–6(8–6)
Winner 3. 1991 Madrid, Spain Clay Uruguay Marcelo Filippini 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 2. 1991 Genova, Italy Clay Germany Carl-Uwe Steeb 3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 3. 1991 Hilversum, Netherlands Clay Sweden Magnus Gustafsson 7–5, 6–7(2–7), 6–2, 1–6, 0–6
Runner-up 4. 1991 Athens, Greece Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 5–7, 3–6
Winner 4. 1991 Buzios, Brazil Clay Brazil Jaime Oncins 1–6, 6–4, 6–0
Runner-up 5. 1992 Hilversum, Netherlands Clay Czechoslovakia Karel Nováček 2–6, 3–6, 6–2, 5–7
Runner-up 6. 1992 Barcelona Olympics, Spain Clay Switzerland Marc Rosset 6–7(2–7), 4–6, 6–3, 6–4, 6–8
Winner 5. 1992 Athens, Greece Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 7–5, 3–0, ret.
Winner 6. 1993 Athens, Greece Clay Spain Alberto Berasategui 6–4, 3–6, 6–3

Doubles finals 10 (6-4)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 1985 Bologna, Italy Clay Spain Alberto Tous Italy Paolo Canè
Italy Simone Colombo
5–7, 4–6
Winner 1. 1986 Bordeaux, France Clay Spain David De Miguel Haiti Ronald Agénor
Iran Mansour Bahrami
7–5, 6–4
Winner 2. 1989 Prague, Czechoslovakia Clay Austria Horst Skoff Czechoslovakia Petr Korda
Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd
6–4, 6–4
Winner 3. 1991 San Marino Clay Spain Carlos Costa Argentina Christian Miniussi
Uruguay Diego Pérez
6–3, 3–6, 6–3
Runner-up 2. 1993 Umag, Croatia Clay Spain Francisco Roig Belgium Filip Dewulf
Belgium Tom Vanhoudt
4–6, 5–7
Runner-up 3. 1994 San Marino Clay Italy Renzo Furlan United Kingdom Neil Broad
United States Greg Van Emburgh
4–6, 6–7
Runner-up 4. 1994 Bucharest, Romania Clay Spain Jose Antonio Conde Australia Wayne Arthurs
Australia Simon Youl
4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 5. 1995 Oporto, Portugal Clay Spain Àlex Corretja Spain Tomás Carbonell
Spain Francisco Roig
3–6, 6–7
Runner-up 6. 1995 Kitzbühel, Austria Clay Australia Wayne Arthurs United States Francisco Montana
United States Greg Van Emburgh
7–6, 3–6, 6–7
Winner 4. 1995 San Marino Clay Australia Andrew Kratzmann Argentina Pablo Albano
Italy Federico Mordegan
7–6, 3–6, 6–2

External links[edit]