Jorge Fondebrider

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Jorge Fondebrider is an Argentinian writer and poet[1][2] born in Buenos Aires in 1956. His published poetry books are Elegías (Buenos Aires, 1983), Imperio de la Luna (Buenos Aires, Libros de Tierra Firme, 1987), Standards (Buenos Aires, Libros de Tierra Firme, 1993) and Los últimos tres años (Buenos Aires, Libros de Tierra Firme, 2006). He also published La Buenos Aires ajena (Buenos Aires, Emecé, 2000), a history of the city told by foreigners that visited it since 1536 to 2000; Versiones de la Patagonia (Buenos Aires, Emecé, 2003), a history of that part of Argentina, told by confronting different versions of the same facts, Licantropía. Historias de hombres lobos de Occidente (Buenos Aires, Adriana Hidalgo, 2004), a history of werewolfism in the Western world through the ages until the present, and La París de los argentinos (Buenos Aires, Bajo la luna, 2010), a history of Argentinian emigration to France as well as a history of France told by Argentinian witnesses. He also translated many books of contemporary French poetry –Guillaume Apollinaire, Henri Deluy and Yves Di Manno, among others–, Poesía francesa contemporánea. 1940-1997, an anthology on that matter, and Irish author Claire Keegan (Antarctica, Walk the Blue Fields and Foster, the three of them on Buenos Aires publishing house Eterna Cadencia). Together with Gerardo Gambolini, he choose and translated Poesía irlandesa contemporánea, the first bilingual anthology of contemporary Irish poetry published in a Spanish speaking country; also, a book on the Ulster cycle, a collection of Irish traditional short stories, a book on Anglo-Scottish ballads and Peter Street & otros poemas, by the Irish poet Peter Sirr. In 2009 he co-founded with Julia Benseñor the Club de Traductores Literarios de Buenos Aires (http://clubdetraductoresliterariosdebaires.blogspot.com/).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Masiello, Francine (2001). The art of transition: Latin American culture and neoliberal crisis. Duke University Press. p. 301. ISBN 978-0-8223-2818-6. Retrieved 14 April 2011. 
  2. ^ Troussier, Virginie (20 March 2011). "De Buenos Aires à Paris : un parcours rêvé d'écrivains". ActuaLitté (in French). Retrieved 14 April 2011.