José Ortiz (comics)

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José Ortiz
José Ortiz.jpg
José Ortiz by Michael Netzer
Born José Ortiz Moya
(1932-09-01)September 1, 1932
Cartagena, Murcia, Spain
Died December 23, 2013(2013-12-23) (aged 81)
Valencia, Spain
Nationality Spanish
Area(s) Penciller, Inker
Pseudonym(s) José Ortiz
Jaimie Ortiz
Notable works
Hombre
Jack el Destripador
Morgan
Burton & Cyb

José Ortiz Moya (September 1, 1932 – December 23, 2013) was a Spanish comics artist, best known for several collaborations with Antonio Segura, such as the series Hombre.

Biography[edit]

José Ortiz Moya career began at an early age, winning an artistic tournament held by the Spanish magazine Chicos. After a period of making pocket sized comics, he created the series Sigur el Vikingo and Johnny Fogata in 1959, and Carolynn Baker for the English newspaper Daily Express in 1962.[1]

Ortiz joined Warren Publishing in 1974 due to his connections with the Valencia studio of Selecciones Illustrada. He would remain with Warren until 1983 and drew more stories for that company (approximately 120) than any other artist.[2] His work included the series Apocalypse, Night of the Jackass and Coffin in Eerie, as well as Pantha in Vampirella and numerous stand alone stories. Ortiz would also draw Vampirella herself in issues 35 and 36 that title. He won the award for 'Best All Around Artist' at Warren in 1974.

A sample of Jose Ortiz's work, from Eerie #65

Following this period in the U.S. comics industry making horror comics, he returned to Spain and formed a lasting and fertile working partnership with Antonio Segura in 1981, initiated by the serial publication of Hombre, a post-apocalyptic saga, in the magazine Cimoc.

By 1983, Ortiz and Segura joined with several other artists including Leopold Sánchez, Manfred Sommer and Jordi Bernet, to form the short-lived publishing house Metropol with the artists' interest in mind, responsible for three comics magazines, Metropol, Mocambo and KO cómics.[3]

During the 1980s Ortiz also produced work for a number of British publications including The Tower King and The House of Daemon for Eagle and The Thirteenth Floor for Scream!. He then moved over to 2000 AD in 1984 where he contributed to a number of stories with most work on Rogue Trooper.

In addition to the continued run of Hombre, Ortiz and Segura created Ives and Las Mil Caras de Jack el Destripador (The Thousand Faces of Jack the Ripper) the following years, later renaming Ives to Morgan. In 1987, they began the humorous sci-fi series Burton & Cyb, followed in 1990 by the series Juan el Largo.[4]

Since 1993, Ortiz has focused on the Italian comics market, illustrating stories for Tex Willer, Ken Parker and Magico Vento.[4]

He died at Valencia on December 23, 2013.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

French titles[edit]

  • Jean le Long (Juan el Largo) with Antonio Segura
  • Jack l'éventreur (Jack el Destripador) with Antonio Segura (1992, Magic Strip, ISBN 2-8035-0277-1)

British titles[edit]

British comics work includes:

  • The Amstor Computer:
    • "714299 - The Computer Murder" (with B. J. Tomlinson, in Eagle #79, 1983)
    • "221 - Nightmare!" (with Alan Hebden, in Eagle #91, 1983)
  • The Helltrekkers (with John Wagner/Alan Grant, as F. Martin Candor, in 2000 AD #387, 1984)
  • Rogue Trooper (as Jaimie Ortiz):
    • "Return of Rogue Trooper" (with Gerry Finley-Day, in 2000 AD #410-419, 1985)
    • "Antigen of Horst" (with Gerry Finley-Day, in 2000 AD #422-426, 428-432, 1985)
    • "Return to Milli-Com" (with Gerry Finley-Day, in 2000 AD #444-449, 1985)
    • "The Fanatics" (with Peter Milligan, in 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special 1986)
    • "Nort by Nortwest" (with Peter Milligan, in 2000AD Annual 1987, 1987)
  • Judge Dredd: "Night of the Ripper" (with John Wagner/Alan Grant, in 2000 AD #517, 1987)
  • A collection of the Scream! story The 13th Floor was published in Ireland in 2007[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "José Ortiz Moya". Comiclopedia. Lambiek. 
  2. ^ The Warren Companion by David A. Roach and Jon B. Cooke. TwoMorrowsPublishing. 2001. p. 253. 
  3. ^ murciacomic.com. "Ortiz". (Spanish)
  4. ^ a b Francisco, Jose Carlos. "Tex Habla Español". texwiller.blog.com reprint. (Portuguese)
  5. ^ http://www.levante-emv.com/cultura/2013/12/24/muere-dibujante-jose-ortiz/1063019.html In Spanish
  6. ^ The 13th Floor review, 2000 AD Reviews

References[edit]

External links[edit]