José de Jesús Méndez Vargas

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José de Jesús Méndez Vargas
Born (1974-02-28) February 28, 1974 (age 40)[1]
El Aguaje, Michoacán, Mexico
Other names El Chango[2]
Occupation Leader of La Familia Michoacana
Criminal charge
Drug trafficking, extortion, kidnapping, murder
Criminal status
Arrested
$2.1 million USD bounty
This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Méndez and the second or maternal family name is Vargas.

José de Jesús Méndez Vargas (a.k.a. El Chango (The Monkey) (born 28 February 1974) is a Mexican drug lord and former leader of the now disbanded La Familia drug cartel, headquartered in the state of Michoacán.[3][4][5]

Méndez took control of the cartel after its former leader, Nazario Moreno, was allegedly killed in a shootout with Mexican Federal Police on December 9, 2010.[6] His protection was the responsibility of twelve gunmen he called the "Twelve Apostles.[7] But his leadership was disputed by Servando Gómez Martínez and Enrique Plancarte Solís who left the organizaton and formed the Knights Templar.

Kingpin Act sanction[edit]

On 25 February 2010, the United States Department of the Treasury sanctioned Méndez under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (sometimes referred to simply as the "Kingpin Act"), for his involvement in drug trafficking along with twenty-one other international criminals and ten foreign entities.[8] The act prohibited U.S. citizens and companies from doing any king of business activity with him, and virtually froze all his assets in the U.S.[9]

Arrest[edit]

Méndez was captured at a road checkpoint on June 21, 2011 by Mexican Federal police in the state of Aguascalientes.[10] The Mexican government had offered a $30 million pesos (US$2.1 million) bounty for information leading to Méndez's capture.[11] On 8 April 2014, a Mexican federal court rejected Méndez's writ of amparo (equivalent to an injunction) to prevent his extradition to the United States, where he is wanted in a New York federal court for drug trafficking offenses.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ LA FAMILIA MICHOACANA: On April 15, 2009, President Obama identified LA FAMILIA MICHOACANA as a significant foreign narcotics trafficker. "Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act." U.S. Department of the Treasury. Office of Foreign Assets Control. February 2010. Retrieved 12 March 2012.
  2. ^ Policía detiene a Jesús Méndez 'El Chango', presunto líder de 'La Familia': El gobierno mexicano dijo que la captura de Jesús Méndez, 'El Chango', "destruye" la estructura de mando de la organización criminal. CNN Mexico. 21 June 2011. Retrieved 7 March 2012.
  3. ^ "A Mexican Cartel's Swift and Grisly Climb". The Washington Post. June 13, 2009. Retrieved 2010-09-26. 
  4. ^ Narcos mexicanos matan a 12 policías en venganza por captura de un capo
  5. ^ La Familia Michoacana - leadership chart
  6. ^ "'La Familia cartel boss' Mendez Vargas held in Mexico". BBC News. 21 June 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-22. 
  7. ^ "El Chango Méndez estaba rodeado por sus '12 apóstoles'". Excelsior. 22 June 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-22. 
  8. ^ "DESIGNATIONS PURSUANT TO THE FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN DESIGNATION ACT". United States Department of the Treasury. 15 May 2014. p. 10. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  9. ^ "An overview of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act". United States Department of the Treasury. 2009. p. 1. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  10. ^ Rene Hernandez; Catherine E. Shoichet (21 June 2011). "Top cartel leader captured". CNN News. Retrieved 2011-06-22. 
  11. ^ "Mexico offers $2 million each for top 24 drug lords". Houston Chronicle. March 24, 2009. Retrieved 2010-09-26. 
  12. ^ Mosso, Rubén (8 April 2014). "Niegan amparo a 'El Chango' Méndez". Milenio (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 9 April 2014. Retrieved 9 April 2014. 

External links[edit]