José Faria

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José Faria
Personal information
Full name José Mehdi Faria
Date of birth (1933-04-26)April 26, 1933
Place of birth Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Date of death October 8, 2013(2013-10-08) (aged 80)
Place of death Rabat, Morocco
Playing position Right winger
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Bonsucesso
Fluminense
1960 Bangu
Teams managed
1968-1979 Fluminense (Youth teams)
1979 Qatar U-19
1979-1982 Al-Sadd
FAR Rabat
1983–1988 Morocco
1995–1997 Olympique de Khouribga
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only. † Appearances (Goals).

José 'Mehdi' Faria (April 26, 1933 – October 8, 2013) was a Brazilian football coach.[1] He coached Morocco in the 1986 FIFA World Cup, when they became the first African team to advance to the second round.

He converted to Islam when coaching Morocco.[2]

Playing Career: Fluminense Coaching Career: Fluminense (1968–1979), Qatar U-19 (1979), Al-Sadd (1979–1982), Morocco, FAR Rabat, Morocco (1983–1988) Olympic Clube de Khouribga (1995–1997)

Managerial career[edit]

Faria started his managerial career in Fluminense's junior teams, where he worked for more than 10 years. He was responsible for the rise of many Brazilian stars, such as World Cup captain Edinho. He received many offers while working in Brazil. However, he rejected them all due to the risk involved. He eventually changed his mind, and accepted an offer to coach the Qatar under-20 team as a replacement for Evaristo de Macedo who temporarily took charge of Iraq in Mexico. He claimed to have made as much money in Qatar in two years as he had made in last 23 years.[3]

He coached the Morocco national team from 1983 till 1988. He rejected an offer from Inter Milan while coaching the team,[3] and converted to Islam, adopting the middle name of "Mehdi".

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former Morocco football coach Jose Faria dies". Sportskeeda. Retrieved 2013-10-10. 
  2. ^ [1][dead link]
  3. ^ a b "New Sunday Times" (in English). 14 June 1986. p. 10. 

External links[edit]