Josef Goller

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Mosaic at the entrance of Christuskirche Bischofswerda (together with Villeroy & Boch)

Josef Goller (25 January 1868 in Dachau – 29 May 1947 in Obermenzing) was a German designer, most notably of stained glass.[1]

Life[edit]

Goller was apprentice at Franz Mayer & Co. and attended the School of Applied Arts in Munich. After a first employment in Zittau he came 1890 to Dresden where he joined the well-known company for stained glass of Bruno Urban, later he became Urban's partner.[2] From 1906 Goller taught at the School of Applied Arts in Dresden, from about 1909 as professor.[3] Among his students were Otto Griebel (stained glass) and Friedrich Kurt Fiedler (graphics). In 1928 Goller returned to Munich.

Artwork[edit]

He created stained glasses for town halls in Nuremberg, Dresden, Chemnitz and for many churches and schools in Saxony, the synagogue of Görlitz, but also for the windows of the neo-Baroque Kaiserpalast, Dresden's most impressive private building that time, Dresden Zoo and Leipzig Hauptbahnhof.[4] Moreover Goller designed the interior of important national and international exhibitions in Dresden,[5][6] as well as the colouring of the foyer in the Semperoper.[7]

Goller became known for his works in Art Nouveau style, but he remained open for new influences. He was a member of Die Elbier, a post-secessionist movement led by Gotthardt Kuehl which reflected impressionism and en plein air.[8] With time Goller became a supporter of form follows function and joined Deutscher Werkbund.[9] Goller created noted posters [10] and designed books. He had friendly relations with Peter Behrens and Johann Vincenz Cissarz.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Josef Ludwig Fischer: Handbuch der Glasmalerei für Forscher, Sammler und Kunstfreunde, wie für Künstler, Architekten und Glasmaler. K. W. Hiersemann, Leipzig, 1914 (three works by Goller)
  2. ^ Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration. Vol. 1. Verlagsanstalt Alexander Koch, Darmstadt, October 1897–March 1898, p. 116
  3. ^ Ortsverein Loschwitz-Wachwitz e. V., Ortsverein Pillnitz e.V. (Ed.): Künstler am Dresdner Elbhang. Vol. 1, Dresden, Elbhang-Kurier-Verlag, 1999, p. 53
  4. ^ Allgemeines Lexikon der bildenden Künstler von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart: Unter Mitwirkung von etwa 400 Fachgelehrten. Ed.: Ulrich Thieme, Hans Vollmer, Felix Becker. Seemann Leipzig, Vol. 14, 1921, p. 345-346
  5. ^ German Art Exhibition, Dresden 1899
  6. ^ Dresden Art Exhibition 1912
  7. ^ Heinrich Magirius: Gottfried Sempers zweites Dresdner Hoftheater. Verlag H. Böhlau, 1985
  8. ^ Paul Schumann: Article on »Die Elbier«
  9. ^ Member list of Deutscher Werkbund, 1 May 1913
  10. ^ Karl Hoffacker: Kunstgewerbeblatt. E.A. Seemann, Leipzig, 1902

External links[edit]