JoS. A. Bank Clothiers

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Jos. A. Bank
Type Public
Traded as NASDAQJOSB
Industry Clothier
Founded Baltimore, Maryland, 1905
Founder(s) Charles Bank
Joseph A. Bank
Headquarters Hampstead, Maryland, U.S.
Key people R. Neal Black, CEO
Products Men's Clothing
Revenue Increase US$ 1.04 billion (2012)[1]
Operating income Decrease US$ 128.4 million (2012)[1]
Net income Decrease US$ 79.6 million (2012)[1]
Total assets Increase US$ 894 million (2012)[1]
Total equity Increase US$ 667.5 million (2012)[1]
Employees 6340[1]
Website www.josbank.com
Jos. A. Bank store, Arborland Center

Joseph A. Bank Clothiers, Inc., also known by the abbreviated name JoS. A. Bank Clothiers, is a retailer of men's clothing, particularly known for its bargain-priced suits.[2] The company, established in 1905, now sells its products through over 800 stores in 42 states and the District of Columbia, as well as through a nationally distributed catalog and an e-commerce website.[3] The company has its headquarters in Hampstead, Carroll County, Maryland.[4][5]

History[edit]

Charles Bank came to Baltimore, Maryland, from Lithuania in 1866 and opened a small tailor shop in the city. By the start of the 20th century, he had branched out into the manufacturing of pants and his grandson, Joseph A. Bank, joined his small company in 1898 as a cloth cutter when he was 11 years old. Over the next ten years, Joseph became a wholesale salesperson, traveling in the South to sell pants.

In 1905, Moses Hartz established a men’s clothing manufacturing company which was taken over by his widow Lena Hartz in 1921. Their daughter, Anna Hartz, was a traveling salesperson for the firm. Although they were rivals in business, Anna married Joseph Bank. In 1922, Joseph joined forces with his new mother-in-law and formed L. Hartz and Bank.[6] This new company manufactured and sold suits to retailers throughout the region.

Over the years, the company grew and prospered and in 1940, they purchased a building on Hopkins Place in Baltimore to house their offices, showroom, shipping area and cutting department. In 1945, Joseph Bank and his son, Howard, bought out the Hartz interest in the company and formed JoS. A. Bank and Co.[7]

Following World War II, there was a severe shortage of men's tailored clothing. A decision was made to specialize in that merchandise and to sell directly to the consumer, rather than wholesale. As a result, a deal was struck with a retailer, Louie's, Inc., in Washington, D.C., to sell their clothing.

In 1954, Joseph Bank died and operation of the company was assumed by Howard.

By 1981, JoS. A. Bank had 11 retail stores and a growing catalog business. That year, the company was purchased by the Quaker Oats Company and became part of their Specialty Retailing group along with Eyelab and Brookstone. That relationship proved mutually beneficial, and by 1985, there were 25 stores. In 1986, Quaker decided to concentrate its efforts on its core businesses and JoS. A. Bank once again became a privately owned corporation. In 1992, their expansion included a franchise concept. In the spring of 1994, JoS. A. Bank Clothiers became a publicly owned company, trading its stock through the NASDAQ stock exchange (JOSB).

In 1998, JoS. A. Bank Clothiers sold its manufacturing division and now out-sources its production. This has enabled the company to focus on its retail business. Much of the tailored clothing is “factory direct”.

JoS. A. Bank launched its Internet site in August 1998. JoS. A. Bank’s current President and CEO is R. Neal Black.

On 12 November 2013, Ricky Sandler, CEO of Eminence Capital LLC, published a letter he sent to Men's Wearhouse CEO Douglas Ewert discussing a merger with Joseph. A. Bank Clothiers Inc as part of an ongoing attempt by JoS. A. Banks to merge with Men's Wearhouse.[8] In December, 2013, JoS. A Bank turned down the takeover offer from competitor Men’s Wearhouse, saying the $1.54 billion bid was too low. [9]On February 14, 2014, Jos. A. Bank Clothiers announced plans to buy outdoor retailer Eddie Bauer in a $825 million deal.[10]On March 11, 2014, JoS. A. Bank and Men's Wearhouse announced that both boards of directors had agreed to merge, with Men's Wearhouse acquiring Bank for $1.8 billion. As part of the deal, Bank would terminate its agreement to acquire Eddie Bauer.

Tuxedo business[edit]

Jos. A. Bank now looks to Gibson-wear tuxedo rentals for the future growth of the company owned by Matt Beans.[11] Throughout the course of 2009, company executives negotiated with Jim's Formalwear of Trenton, Illinois, one of the largest wholesale distributors of men's formalwear in the United States, to join the large network of nearly 6,000 authorized Jim's Formalwear retailers throughout the country. Rollout began in early 2010 with stores in Baltimore, Maryland, and Richmond, Virginia. The new tuxedo rental line of business is designed to compete with MensWearhouse's rental business and provide a "first point of contact" with younger prospective customers whose style of dress is much more casual than previous generations. The selection of tuxedos is drawn from, but more limited than, the catalog offered the rest of Jim's network of independent retailers.

Popular culture[edit]

A March 2014 episode of Saturday Night Live teased the company's aggressive promotions and discounting strategy with a fake commercial in which Jos. A. Bank suits were promoted as an alternative to paper towels. In the ad, Vanessa Bayer declares "with their innovative 'Buy 1, Get 3 Free' pricing, a suit from Jos. A. Bank is effectively cheaper than paper towels!" The sketch went on to show Bayer using Jos. A. Bank suits to clean-up food spills and dog urine.[12] [13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION, WASHINGTON, DC 20549 : FORM 10-K : Annual Report". Phx.corporate-ir.net. Retrieved 2013-11-02. 
  2. ^ Stock, Kyle (26 November 2013). "Men's Wearhouse Will See Your Cheap-Suit Bid and Raise It". businessweek.com. BusinessWeek. Retrieved 19 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "Company Information". JoS. A. Bank Clothiers, Inc. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Career Opportunities." JoS. A. Bank Clothiers. Retrieved on May 15, 2010.
  5. ^ "Town of Hampstead Zoning Map." Town of Hampstead. Retrieved on May 15, 2010.
  6. ^ [1][dead link]
  7. ^ "History of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers, Inc. – FundingUniverse". Fundinguniverse.com. Retrieved 2013-11-02. 
  8. ^ Karr, Arnold J. (12 November 2013). "Men's Wearhouse Open to Jos. A. Bank Talks, Investor Says". WWD. Retrieved 12 November 2013. 
  9. ^ AP (23 December 2013). "Jos. A. Bank Turns Down Men’s Wearhouse Offer". Advisories. Retrieved 23 December 2013. 
  10. ^ Sherman, Natalie and Mirabella, Lorraine. "Jos. A. Bank to acquire Eddie Bauer in deal worth $825 million". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 15 February 2014. 
  11. ^ "Jos. A. Bank :: Partner Website :: Investor Relations :: Press Release". Phx.corporate-ir.net. Retrieved 2013-11-02. 
  12. ^ Dumenco, Simon (31 March 2014). "Did Jos. A. Bank's Buy-1-Get-3-Free Suit Sales Make This Harsh 'SNL' Parody Inevitable?". adage.com. Ad Age. Retrieved 19 April 2014. 
  13. ^ Swift, Tim (31 March 2014). "'Saturday Night Live' literally burns Jos. A. Bank with brutal parody". baltimoresun.com. Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 19 April 2014. 

External links[edit]