Joseph Clarke (architect)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Joseph Clarke
Born 1819 or 1820
Died 1888[1]
Nationality British
Projects Gloucester and Bristol Diocesan Training Institution;
Culham College

Joseph Clarke, FRIBA (1819/20–81) was a British Gothic Revival architect who practised in London, England.[1]

Career[edit]

In 1839 Clarke exhibited an antiquarian drawing with the Oxford Society for Promoting the Study of Gothic Architecture.[2] He was made an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in 1841 and a Fellow of the RIBA in 1850.[1] He became a member of the Ecclesiological Society in 1853.[3] He served as Diocesan Surveyor to the sees of Canterbury and Rochester, and from 1871 to the see of St Albans.[1] He was also Consultant Architect to the Charity Commissioners.[1]

In 1852 Clarke published Schools and Schoolhouses: a series of Views, Plans, and Details, for Rural Parishes. In this he condemned the set of model plans issued by the Committee of Council on Education as "unsuitable in every way" and stressed the advantages of employing an architect for any new school, rather than relying on a standardised design:[4]

The plan should always be formed to the site, and reference had to local materials; the design of the school, again, should conform to the materials. Brick and stone each require their separate uses, and so their several applications.[4]

The book included plans of twelve schools he had built in Kent, Essex and Oxfordshire, at Monks Horton, Lydd, Little Bentley, Coggeshall, Clifton Hampton, Coopershall, Wellesborough, Brabourne, Boreham, Foxearth, Hatfield and Leigh (Essex).[5]

He drew up ambitious plans for an extension to the House of Charity in Greek Street Soho, including a chapel, refectory, dormitories and cloisters. Only the chapel (begun 1862) was actually built.[6] His association with commissions in Oxfordshire make it possible that he was the "Joseph Clarke, esq., architect" who presented plans for restoring the gatehouse at Rye, the intended scene of the Rye House Plot, to the Oxford Architectural Society in May 1842.[7]

Clarke exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1845 and 1870. The exhibition catalogues give his address as 1, Lincoln's Inn Fields, from 1845 to 1850; and 13, Stratford Place, thereafter.[8]

Work[edit]

Buildings[edit]

Gloucester and Bristol Diocesan Training Institution, Fishponds, Gloucestershire: designed with John Norton, built 1852
St Mary the Virgin parish church, Farnham, Essex, built 1858–59

Writings[edit]

  • A Series of Views, plans, and Details, for Rural Schoolhouses. London: J. Masters. 1852. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Brodie et al. 2001, p. 383
  2. ^ Proceedings (Oxford Society for Promoting the Study of Gothic Architecture): 23. 1839. 
  3. ^ "Ecclesiological Late Cambridge Camden Society". The Ecclesiologist 15: 44. 1854. 
  4. ^ a b "School Architecture". The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal 15: 161. June 1852. Retrieved 5 November 2009. 
  5. ^ "Reviews". The Ecclesiologist 13: 199. 1852. 
  6. ^ Sheppard 1966[page needed]
  7. ^ Noted in "Architecture". The Gentleman's Magazine: 78. July 1842. 
  8. ^ Graves 1905, p. 70.
  9. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 688.
  10. ^ Colvin 1997, pp. 1065–1067 s.v. "Underwood, Henry Jones"
  11. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 611.
  12. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 565.
  13. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 566.
  14. ^ Subject of an article in "Gloucester and Bristol Diocesan Training Institution". The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal 15: 361. November 1852. Retrieved 5 November 2009. 
  15. ^ Pevsner 1966, p. 66.
  16. ^ Newman 1969, p. 567.
  17. ^ "The Church of St Alban's". Living Memories: Churches & Faith. Sparth then and now. 
  18. ^ Salter 2000, page 131
  19. ^ Bettley & Pevsner 2007[page needed]
  20. ^ Stephens, W.B. (1970). History of Congleton: Published to Celebrate the 700th Anniversary of the Granting of the Charter to the Town. Manchester: Manchester University Press. p. 222. ISBN 978-0-7190-1245-7. 
  21. ^ Eastlake 1872, p. 402.
  22. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 426.
  23. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 754.
  24. ^ Pevsner & Lloyd 1967, p. 754.
  25. ^ "Churches Restored or Enlarged". The Church Builder: 89. 1867. 
  26. ^ Tender reported in The Builder 28: 234. 19 March 1870. 
  27. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 538..
  28. ^ Newman 1976, p. 430.
  29. ^ "Holy Trinity, Beckenham". John E. Vigar's Kent Churches. 2013. 

Sources[edit]