Joseph Miville Dechene

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Joseph Miville Dechêne
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta
In office
July 18, 1921 – June 28, 1926
Preceded by Wilfrid Gariépy
Succeeded by John Delisle
Constituency Beaver River
In office
June 19, 1930 – August 22, 1935
Preceded by Laudas Joly
Succeeded by Joseph Beaudry
Constituency St. Paul
Member of the Canadian House of Commons
In office
March 26, 1940 – February 1, 1958
Preceded by Percy Rowe
Succeeded by Jack Bigg
Constituency Athabaska
Personal details
Born October 22, 1879
Chambord, Quebec
Died December 1, 1962(1962-12-01) (aged 83)
Political party Alberta Liberal
federal Liberal
Occupation farmer and politician

Joseph Miville Dechêne (October 22, 1879 – December 1, 1962) was Canadian farmer and politician who served in all three levels of government during his career. He served as a councillor of the town of Bonnyville from 1928 to 1934. He also served as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1921 to 1926 and again from 1930 to 1935 sitting with the Liberals in opposition. He later sat as a member of the Canadian House of Commons sitting with the Liberal caucus from 1940 to 1958.

Early life[edit]

Joseph Miville Dechene was born on October 22, 1879 in Chambord, Quebec.[1]

Dechene began his political career as a Councilor in the small town of Bonnyville, Alberta. He served that position from 1928 to 1934.[1]

Provincial politics[edit]

Dechene ran for a seat to the Alberta Legislature for the first time in the 1921 Alberta general election. He ran as a candidate of the Liberal party, winning the Beaver River electoral district by a comfortable margin to hold it for the Liberals.[2]

Dechene would stand for re-election in the 1926 Alberta general election but loose almost half of his popular vote from the previous election and suffer defeat to United Farmers candidate John Delisle.[3]

Dechene would not be deterred by defeat and ran for a seat in the 1930 Alberta general election. This time he would run in the neighboring St. Paul electoral district. He would defeat incumbent Laudas Joly to win his second term in provincial office by just 18 votes.[4]

Dechene ran for his third term in the 1935 Alberta general election. He faced Joly once again as well as Social Credit candidate Joseph Beaudry. The race was hotly contested with Beaudry defeating Dechene in the second count.[5]

Federal politics[edit]

Dechene ran for a seat to the Canadian House of Commons in the 1940 Canadian federal election as a Liberal candidate in the electoral district of Athabaska. He faced a hotly contested race against two incumbents. Dechene won the election by 1,100 votes over Hayhurst who transferred from the Vegreville electoral district while Rowe finished a distant third place.[6]

Dechene ran for his second term in office in the 1945 Canadian federal election. The election was a closely contested five way race. Dechene hung onto his seat with 35% of the popular vote.[7]

Dechene ran for his third term in office in the 1949 Canadian federal election. He faced four other candidates including former Member of Parliament Orvis Kennedy. He would win the race increasing his plurality by taking 45% of the popular vote.[8]

The 1953 Canadian federal election saw Dechene run for his fourth term in office. He won the four way race with his largest plurality of his federal career taking almost 50% of the popular vote.[9]

Dechene ran for his fifth and final term in the 1957 Canadian federal election.[10] He barely held his seat almost losing to Social Credit candidate Archie McPhail. Dechene retired from federal politics at dissolution of the Commons a year later in 1958.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Dechene, Joseph Milville federal political experience". Parliament of Canada. Retrieved May 4, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Beaver River Official Results 1921 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Beaver River Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  4. ^ "St. Paul Official Results 1930 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  5. ^ "St. Paul Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Athabaska Election Results". Parliament of Canada. March 26, 1940. Retrieved May 2, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Athabaska Election Results". Parliament of Canada. June 11, 1945. Retrieved May 2, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Athabaska Election Results". Parliament of Canada. June 27, 1949. Retrieved May 2, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Athabaska Election Results". Parliament of Canada. August 10, 1953. Retrieved May 2, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Athabaska Election Results". Parliament of Canada. June 10, 1957. Retrieved May 2, 2010. 

External links[edit]