Joseph Rickaby

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Joseph John Rickaby (1845-1932) was an English Jesuit priest and philosopher.

Life[edit]

He was born in 1845 in Everingham, York. He received his education at Stonyhurst College, and was ordained in 1877, one of the so-called Stonyhurst Philosophers,[1] a significant group for neo-scholasticism in England.[2] At the time he was at St Beuno's, he was on friendly terms with Gerard Manley Hopkins;[3] they were ordained on the same day.

His Moral Philosophy of 1901, in the Stonyhurst Philosophical Series,[4] gave a theological argument for the proposition that animal rights do not exist.[5]

He had some affiliation with Clarke's Hall in Worcester College, Oxford. He would deliver conferences to Catholic undergraduates of Oxford and Cambridge.[6][7] His work is quoted by C.E. Raven in his Science, Religion, and The Future (1943, p. 9).

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jill Muller, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Victorian Catholicism: A Heart in Hiding (2003), p. 89; the others were Richard F. Clarke, Herbert Lucas, and his brothers John Rickaby.
  2. ^ http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10746a.htm
  3. ^ Joseph J. Feeney, The Playfulness of Gerard Manley Hopkins (2008), p. 18.
  4. ^ http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12025c.htm
  5. ^ Gary Steiner, Anthropocentrism and Its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy (2005), p. 114.
  6. ^ The Catholic Who's who and Yearbook By Francis Cowley Burnand Published by Burns & Oates, 1908
  7. ^ World Cat Identities

External links[edit]