Joseph W. McCarthy

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Joseph William McCarthy, AIA, was an architect in the early 20th century most famous for his work on buildings for the Roman Catholic Church. He was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, on June 22, 1884, and attended Holy Innocents School in New York City until the 8th grade. He moved to Chicago, Illinois, and graduated from St. Gabriel High School in 1901 before entering the architecture firm of Daniel Burnham, a noted Chicago architect for whom he worked eight years. He then worked for two years with British-born Chicago church architect J.E.O. Pridmore before opening his own practice in 1911.[1]

He later worked under the firm name of McCarthy, Smith and Eppig, and also McCarthy and Smith. Others with whom he worked in the late 1950s as "Joseph W. McCarthy and Associates" included Richard R. Reedy and Max A. Eckert. He served as chairman of the Chicago Housing Authority from 1938 to 1942[2] and was given the Catholic honor of Knight of St. Sylvester by Cardinal Mundelein of Chicago in 1924.[3] He died in 1965 at the age of 81.[4]

McCarthy is credited with at least 41 churches in addition to schools, hospitals, convents and other buildings.[5]

Although McCarthy frequently designed his buildings using the traditional Gothic and Romanesque styles, he was one of the only American Catholic architects of his time to also design churches in the New England colonial mode. He is also noted for the unique design of the Art Deco altars that were installed in many of his churches.

Favored not only by Cardinal Mundelein but several other Catholic Church officials, McCarthy was one of the most prolific designers of buildings for the Roman Catholic Church in the United States in the early twentieth century.[6] His credited buildings include the 15-floor Mundelein College Skyscraper at Loyola University Chicago, constructed in 1931, and the entire campus design at Mundelein Seminary, constructed 1918-1934, as well as the Benedictine Convent and shrine in Libertyville, Illinois (now known as Marytown), Immaculate Conception Church in Waukegan, Illinois, Our Lady of Peace Church in Chicago, the Cathedral of St. Raymond in Joliet, Illinois, and the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Springfield, Illinois.[7] He was also the architect of record for the Saint Philip Neri Church (1928), on East 72nd Street, in Chicago's south side, a high rise on 1540 North Lake Drive (17 floors), opened 1926, and the Corpus Christi Church, constructed in 1916, on East 49th Street, in Chicago's south side.[8] An article on McCarthy's involvement in the Springfield Cathedral appeared in 1929.[9] Other buildings include Chicago's Notre Dame High School for Girls (c. 1938), Mercy High School in Chicago (31st Street, c. 1923), the upper church of Santa Sabina Church in Chicago, and the rectory of Chicago's Holy Name Cathedral.

Works include[edit]

Under his own name:

  • St. Francis Xavier Church, La Grange, Illinois
  • Mary, Queen of Heaven Church, Cicero, Illinois
  • Immaculate Conception Church, Waukegan, Illinois
  • Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Springfield, Illinois[10]
  • Cathedral of St. Raymond Nonnatus, Joliet, Illinois[11]
  • St. Philip Neri Church, South Shore neighborhood, Chicago, Illinois[12]
  • Our Lady of Peace, South Shore neighborhood, Chicago
  • Corpus Christi Church, South Side neighborhood, Chicago
  • St. Sabina Church, Auburn/Gemsham neighborhood, Chicago
  • Our Lady of Lourdes Church, Chicago (original building by Worthmann and Steinbach later enlarged and relocated by McCarthy)
  • St. Basil Church, New City neighborhood, Chicago
  • St. Teresa of the Infant Jesus Church, Auburn/Gemsham neighborhood, Chicago
  • Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, St. Mary of the Lake Seminary, Mundelein, Illinois
  • St. Thomas of Canterbury Church, Uptown neighborhood, Chicago
  • St. Jerome Church, Chicago (original building by Charles H. Prindeville, sanctuary enlarged at east end with new altar by McCarthy)

With McCarthy, Smith and Eppig:

  • St. Joseph Church, Wilmette, Illinois
  • St. Francis Church, Wilmette
  • St. Athanasius Church, Evanston, Illinois
  • St. Giles Church, Oak Park, Illinois
  • Our Lady of Grace Church, Logan Square neighborhood, Chicago
  • St. Killian Church, Auburn/Grensham neighborhood, Chicago
  • Blessed Sacrament Church, North Lawndale neighborhood, Chicago
  • St. Wencheslaus Church, Avondale neighborhood, Chicago
  • St. Edward Church, Chicago
  • Queen of Angels Church, Chicago

References[edit]

  1. ^ Biography of McCCarthy, Archives of the Archdiocese of Chicago.
  2. ^ Obituary, New York Times
  3. ^ Chicago Daily Tribune, May 4, 1924, pg. 1
  4. ^ Obituary, New York Times, July 26. 1965, p. 23
  5. ^ "Schedule Mass in Cathedral for Architect," Chicago Tribune, July 26, 1965.
  6. ^ Women and Leadership Archives (WLA). Mundelein College Record Collection. B.1..3g. 2006 Chicago Landmark Application.
  7. ^ Denis R. McNamara, Heavenly City: The Architectural Tradition of Catholic Chicago (Chicago: LTP, 2005)
  8. ^ Joseph William McCarthy at Emporis
  9. ^ "The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Springfield, Illinois," Through the Ages, v. 6, March 1929, pp. 15-22.
  10. ^ http://www.romeofthewest.com/2007/09/photos-of-cathedral-of-immaculate.html Photos of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Springfield IL
  11. ^ http://www.romeofthewest.com/2007/09/photos-of-cathedral-of-saint-raymond.html Photos of the Cathedral of St. Raymond Nonnatus
  12. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=gDZMAFxPxwMC&pg=PA92&lpg=PA92&dq=Saint+Philip+Neri+Church++Chicago&source=bl&ots=Ts7W1S1GcU&sig=H1xXCvLSeFjEk7gblGl5Ka5iACw&hl=en&ei=CTXnTKG-F8GB8gaen8mNDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&sqi=2&ved=0CCwQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Saint%20Philip%20Neri%20Church%20%20Chicago&f=false Heavenly City: The Architectural Tradition of Catholic Chicage by Denis R. McNamara, St. Philip Neri Church