Josephine Diebitsch Peary

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Josephine Diebitsch Peary studio portrait in 1892, following her expedition to Greenland
Peary circa 1913

Josephine Cecilia Diebitsch Peary (May 22, 1863 – December 19, 1955) was an American author and arctic explorer.[1][2]

She was born as Josephine Cecilia Diebitsch in Forestville, Maryland on May 22, 1863 to a linguist at the Smithsonian Institution. She had a brother, Emil Diebitsch who would later become the Mayor of Nutley, New Jersey.[3] In 1888 she married Arctic explorer Robert Peary, whom she often accompanied on his northern travels, recording her experiences in a series of books including My Arctic Journal and The Snow Baby. She died on December 19, 1955,[2][4] only a few months after having been granted the National Geographic Society's highest honor, the Medal of Achievement, for her Arctic accomplishments.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Josephine Diebitsch Peary". Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum. Retrieved 2010-12-18. 
  2. ^ a b "Mrs. Peary Is Dead At 92". Baltimore Sun. December 20, 1955. Retrieved 2010-12-19. "Mrs. Josephine Diebitsch Peary, 92, widow of the American naval officer who discovered the North Pole in 1909, and an Arctic explorer in her own right, died today." 
  3. ^ "Peary's Discovery of Pole Celebrated. His Widow Is Among Guests at a Dinner Party". New York Times. April 7, 1939. Retrieved 2011-11-01. "Mrs. Peary was accompanied by her brother, Emil Diebitsch, with whom she lives in Nutley, NJ ..." 
  4. ^ "Woman Arctic Explorer Dies. Widow Of Famed Explorer Ventured Into Far North". The Bulletin. December 20, 1955. Retrieved 2010-12-19. "Mrs Josephine Diebitsch Peary, 92-year-old widow of the American naval officer who discovered the North Pole in 1909 died at Port land, Maine, yesterday. ..." 
  5. ^ "Josephine Diebitsch Peary Collection, 1861-2003, University of New England, Maine Women Writers Collection". Retrieved 2012-03-15. "On May 6, 1955, Josephine was awarded the National Geographic Society's highest honor, their Medal of Achievement. This solid-gold, custom-designed award is one that very few women have ever received."