Joshua Foer

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Joshua Foer in 2007

Joshua Foer (born Sept. 23, 1982) is a freelance journalist living in New Haven, Connecticut, with a primary focus on science. He was the 2006 U.S.A. Memory Champion, which was described in his 2011 book, Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything. He spoke at the TED conference in February 2012.

Personal life[edit]

Foer is the younger brother of New Republic editor Franklin Foer and novelist Jonathan Safran Foer. He is the son of Esther Foer, Director of Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, and Albert Foer, a think-tank president.[1] He was born in Washington, D.C. and attended Georgetown Day School. In 2004, he graduated from Yale University, where he lived in Silliman College and then Trumbull College.

Career[edit]

Foer sold his first book, Moonwalking with Einstein, to Penguin for publication in March 2011.[2] He received a $1.2 million advance for the book.[1] Film rights were optioned by Columbia Pictures shortly after publication.[3]

In 2006, Foer won the U.S.A. Memory Championship, and set a new USA record in the "speed cards" event by memorizing a deck of 52 cards in 1 minute and 40 seconds.[4] Moonwalking with Einstein describes Foer's journey as a participatory journalist to becoming a national champion mnemonist, under the tutelage of British Grand Master of Memory, Ed Cooke.

Foer's work has appeared in The New York Times,[5] The Washington Post,[6] Slate,[7] and The Nation.[8] In 2007, the quarterly art & culture journal Cabinet began publishing Foer's column "A Minor History Of". The column "examines an overlooked cultural phenomenon using a timeline".[9]

Organizations[edit]

Foer has organized several websites and organizations based on his interests. He created the Athanasius Kircher Society, which had only one session, featuring Kim Peek and Joseph Kittinger.[1]. He is the co-founder, along with Dylan Thuras, of the Atlas Obscura,[10] an online compendium of "The World's Wonders, Curiosities, and Esoterica". He is also a co-organizer of Sukkah City.[11] Josh is also a co-founder of Sefaria, a non-profit organization dedicated to building digital experiences and infrastructure for Jewish texts.[12]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dowd, Maureen (2011-03-08). "Sexy Ruses to Stop Forgetting to Remember". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ Third Foer brother inks Penguin deal, Crain's New York Business, October 31, 2006
  3. ^ Kilday, Gregg (March 16, 2011). "Columbia Acquires 'Moonwalking With Einstein' for Big-Screen Adaptation". The Hollywood Reporter. 
  4. ^ Foer, Joshua (2011-02-15). "Secrets of a Mind-Gamer". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-02-18. 
  5. ^ The Kiss of Life, The New York Times, February 14, 2006
  6. ^ "The Sky Isn't Falling (Yet)". The Washington Post. 2004-10-26. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  7. ^ Rosin, Hanna. "How to win the U.S. memory championship. - Slate Magazine". Slate.com. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  8. ^ "May 16, 2005". The Nation. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  9. ^ "Columns". Cabinet issue 26: pg. 7. 
  10. ^ "Curious and Wondrous Travel Destinations". Atlas Obscura. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  11. ^ "Sukkah City" Sam Grawe, Dwell, 05/30/2010.
  12. ^ "'Sefaria' Text Site Could Expand Jewish Learning". The Jewish Week. 

External links[edit]