Joshua Kurlantzick

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Joshua Kurlantzick is an American journalist from Baltimore, Maryland, United States. He is a Fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations.[1] Kurlantzick is the author of Charm Offensive: How China's Soft Power Is Transforming the World,[2] which was nominated for the Council on Foreign Relations's 2008 Arthur Ross Book Award.[3]

Kurlantzick was most recently a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he studied Southeast Asian politics and economics and China’s relations with Southeast Asia, including Chinese investment, aid, and diplomacy. Previously, he was a fellow at the University of Southern California Center on Public Diplomacy [4] and a fellow at the Pacific Council on International Policy.

He has also served as a columnist for Time, a special correspondent for The New Republic, a senior correspondent for American Prospect, and a contributing writer for Mother Jones. He also serves on the editorial board of Current History.

He is the winner of the Luce Scholarship for journalism in Asia and was selected as a finalist for the Osborn Elliot Prize for journalism in Asia.

Kurlantzick has frequently been taken to task for alleged inaccuracies in his reporting, especially his preferred mode of "first-hand" accounts where the only support for his claims is in his notes.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Joshua Kurlantzick - Council on Foreign Relations". Cfr.org. Retrieved 2013-10-13. 
  2. ^ "Charm Offensive: How China's Soft Power Is Transforming the World (A New Republic Book): Joshua Kurlantzick: 9780195695113: Amazon.com: Books". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2013-10-13. 
  3. ^ "Council's 2008 Arthur Ross Book Award Shortlist Announced - Council on Foreign Relations". Cfr.org. 2008-04-01. Retrieved 2013-10-13. 
  4. ^ "Home Page | USC Center on Public Diplomacy | Home Page". Uscpublicdiplomacy.org. Retrieved 2013-10-13. 
  5. ^ "Tsunami Blame Game". Hit and Run. 2005-01-10. ; entry dissecting alleged exaggerations and improbabilities in a first-person piece on the child sex trade "TNR on Bangkok". Bangkok Pundit. 2006-08-26. 

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