Joshua Soule Zimmerman

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Honorable
Joshua Soule Zimmerman
Joshua Soule Zimmerman.jpg
Portrait of Joshua Soule Zimmerman during his tenure in the West Virginia House of Delegates.
Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates
from the Hampshire County district
In office
1921–1924
Preceded by James Sloan Kuykendall
Succeeded by Henry Washington Campbell, Jr.
Prosecuting Attorney for Hampshire County
In office
1900–1910
Preceded by William B. Cornwell
Personal details
Born (1874-01-16)January 16, 1874
near La Plata, Charles County, Maryland, United States
Died September 2, 1962(1962-09-02) (aged 88)
Williamsport, Maryland, United States
Resting place Indian Mound Cemetery, Romney, West Virginia, United States
Political party Democratic Party
Spouse(s) Kitty Campbell Vance
Relations George Henry Zimmerman (father)
Henrietta A. Rowe (mother)
Children Mary Elizabeth Zimmerman Kump
George Henry Zimmerman
Kitty Campbell Zimmerman McCracken
Vance Zimmerman
Residence Romney, West Virginia, United States
Alma mater Roanoke College
Randolph–Macon College (A.B.)
Columbian University Law School (LL. B.)
Profession lawyer, politician, and orchardist
Religion Methodist

Joshua Soule Zimmerman (January 16, 1874 – September 2, 1962) was an American lawyer, politician, and orchardist in the U.S. state of West Virginia. Zimmerman served as a Democratic member of the West Virginia House of Delegates (1921–1924) and as the Prosecuting Attorney for Hampshire County (1900–1910).

Early life and family[edit]

Joshua Soule Zimmerman was born on January 16, 1874 near La Plata in Charles County, Maryland at the ancestral home of his mother, Henrietta A. Rowe Zimmerman.[1][2][3][4] His father was Reverend George Henry Zimmerman, a Methodist pastor and church administrator[1][4] whose family originated from an estate in Baltimore County near Baltimore, Maryland.[4] Zimmerman's father presided over the Moorefield district of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1894–1898).[3][5][6] It is likely that Zimmerman's father named him in honor of Joshua Soule (1781–1867), a bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Zimmerman had two brothers: Edgar Rowe Zimmerman of Ruxton, Maryland[3][4] and George Henry Zimmerman of Whitesburg, Kentucky.[3][4]

The pastoral profession of Zimmerman's father caused his family to relocate to a number of towns throughout Virginia, Maryland, and West Virginia.[4] Zimmerman spent the majority of is youth in Woodstock and Salem, Virginia before his father transferred to Romney, West Virginia to preside over the Moorefield district of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.[1][4]

Education[edit]

Zimmerman attended Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia from 1885 to 1886[2][4][7] and in 1888, he began attending Randolph–Macon College in Ashland, Virginia where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1892.[2][4][7][8][9] Following his graduation, Zimmerman worked briefly as a tutor on a plantation near Shelby, Mississippi.[4]

In 1893, Zimmerman accepted the position of a clerk in the United States Census Office in Washington, D.C. during the second administration of United States President Grover Cleveland.[4] During his three years serving in the United States Census Office, Zimmerman completed night courses in jurisprudence at Columbian University Law School[2][4][8] and he graduated from the institution with a Bachelor of Laws degree in 1896.[2][4][7][9][10] While attending Columbian University, Zimmerman also served as editor of the 1896 Class Book[7] and resided at 915 I Street, Northwest near Mount Vernon Square.[8]

Zimmerman was a member of the Phi Delta Theta social fraternity[7][11] and of the Phi Delta Phi legal honor society.[7][11][12] He was later made a Golden Legionnaire of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity.[9]

Law career[edit]

Following his graduation from Columbian University Law School, Zimmerman opened his law office in Romney, West Virginia in July 1896 and began engaging in the practice of law there.[1][2][9][11] His first legal case argued before the Hampshire County Circuit Court, West Virginia v. Smith, in which his client was charged with "breaking and entering with intent to commit larceny."[11] Zimmerman lost this case.[11] In Hu Maxwell and Howard Llewellyn Swisher's History of Hampshire County, West Virginia: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present (1897), Zimmerman was described as "a young man" who had "made his success at the bar of Hampshire."[13] Zimmerman's law practice expanded, and he began arguing cases in adjoining West Virginia county courts and in both the West Virginia state and United States federal courts.[11]

Only seven years after starting his law practice, Zimmerman was appointed to fill the unexpired term of Prosecuting Attorney for Hampshire County, William B. Cornwell, who had resigned from the position.[1][2][9][11] Zimmerman was subsequently reelected twice to the position,[11] and he served as Hampshire County's prosecuting attorney from 1900 until 1910 (a total of nine years and three months).[1][2][11] Zimmerman also served as one of three chancery commissioners for Hampshire County, during which he served with Christian Streit White, Robert White, and James Sloan Kuykendall.[14][15] He was a member of the West Virginia Bar Association.[11]

Zimmerman was the lawyer for the Capon Valley Bank, headquartered in Wardensville, West Virginia, and provided his legal services to secure the bank's incorporation.[11] During World War I, Zimmerman served as a member of Hampshire County's Legal Advisory Board and was the lawyer for the County Food Administration.[11] Following the outbreak of World War I, Zimmerman registered for the draft during the registration for men aged 18 through 45 under the Selective Service Act of 1917.[11] After the Winchester and Western Railroad Company received its charter on August 31, 1916[16] to build and operate a rail line connecting Wardensville and the Lost River valley of West Virginia to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the Cumberland Valley Railroad at Winchester, Virginia,[17][18] Zimmerman served as the company's secretary.[16][17]

Political career[edit]

Portrait of Joshua Soule Zimmerman as a young lawyer, prior to 1897.

Zimmerman became a prominent leader within the Democratic Party in Hampshire County, which was the dominant political party in the county.[11] At various times, Zimmerman served as the chairman of the Hampshire County Democratic Party Committee, a member of the Second District Congressional Committee, and attended judicial, senatorial, and state conventions.[11]

West Virginia House of Delegates[edit]

Zimmerman was nominated as the Democratic Party candidate for a seat representing Hampshire County in the West Virginia House of Delegates in 1920.[2][11] Zimmerman won the seat against Republican Party candidate C. W. Rogers in the November 1920 general election[9][11][19] and served as a member of the West Virginia House of Delegates from 1921 to 1924.[1][2][20] Following his election, Zimmerman was made the Democratic Party's floor leader in the West Virginia House of Delegates.[9][11]

Zimmerman was appointed by West Virginia Governor John Jacob Cornwell to serve on a West Virginia Legislature select committee charged with drafting a road transportation bill under West Virginia Senate Joint Resolution No. 21 of May 21, 1919,[2][11] known as the West Virginia State Road Law.[11] The new West Virginia State Road Law became necessary following the authorization of a 50 million USD bond issue during the 1920 general election.[11] Zimmerman was again appointed by Governor Cornwell to serve on a similar select committee following the ratification of the "Good Roads Amendment" of the Constitution of West Virginia in 1920.[2][11]

During the 1921 legislative session, Zimmerman was assigned to the Judiciary,[2][21] Roads,[2] and Game and Fish committees.[2][22] Also during the 1921 legislative session, Zimmerman sponsored the following bills:

  • H.B. 274 (Ch. 158), which gave county courts the authority to impose a "special building levy" not to exceed 30 cents for the purpose of completing the construction or repair of county courthouses.[23]
  • H.B. 392 (Ch. 49), which provided for the establishment of a county high school for Hampshire County and authorized the Hampshire County Board of Education to impose a levy not to exceed 30 cents for three years to construct and maintain the high school.[24]

Throughout his tenure in the West Virginia House of Delegates, Zimmerman supported legislation that strictly enforced prohibition.[11]

Agricultural pursuits[edit]

Zimmerman played an active role in the commercial apple orchard industry of Hampshire County, in which he was responsible for the promotion of several of the county's orchard companies, served as an officer and legal advisor to orchard companies, and owned 150 acres (0.61 km2) of his own commercial apple orchards.[11] According to the 1919 Census of the Commercial Apple Orchards in West Virginia published by the West Virginia Department of Agriculture, Zimmerman was engaged in the management of three commercial apple orchards near Romney, West Virginia: Fairfax Orchard Company, which produced Stark Delicious apples;[25] Gilkeson, Hart & Zimmerman Orchard, which produced York Imperial, Pennsylvania Winesap, Ben Davis, Stayman Winesap, Jonathan, Grimes Golden, and Rome Beauty apples;[26] and the Mill Mountain Orchard Company, which produced York Imperial, Stayman Winesap, Pennsylvania Winesap, Rambo, Northern Spy, Canada Red, Ben Davis, Grimes Golden, Jonathan, Rome Beauty, Yellow Transparent, and Stark apples.[26]

Marriage and children[edit]

Gravestone at the interment site of Joshua Soule Zimmerman at Indian Mound Cemetery in Romney, West Virginia.

Zimmerman married Kitty Campbell Vance on October 10, 1900 near Romney, West Virginia.[1][11][27] Kitty Campbell Vance was the daughter of John T. and Mary Elizabeth Inskeep Vance of Romney.[11] Zimmerman and his wife Kitty had four children:[11]

  • Mary Elizabeth Zimmerman Kump (born March 21, 1903),[11][28] married Garnett Kerr Kump in 1940 in Hampshire County, West Virginia[29]
  • George Henry Zimmerman (born February 20, 1905)[11][30]
  • Kitty Campbell Zimmerman McCracken,[11][31] married James Paris McCracken of Cisco, Texas at the Romney Presbyterian Church in Romney, West Virginia on August 20, 1946[31][32]
  • Vance Zimmerman (born August 5, 1910),[11][31][33] married Mildred Sites in 1937 in Hampshire County, West Virginia[34]

Zimmerman was an active layperson in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and served as a steward of the Romney Methodist Episcopal Church, South congregations.[9][11] He also served for a number of years as the superintendent of the congregation's Sunday school program.[11] Zimmerman represented the church in the Moorefield district and annual conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.[11] Despite his involvement in the Southern Methodist church, his wife Kitty and several of his children were Presbyterian.[11]

Later life and death[edit]

Zimmerman's wife Kitty predeceased him in 1937.[35] He died in Williamsport, Maryland on September 2, 1962.[1][9] Zimmerman is interred with his wife Kitty at Indian Mound Cemetery in Romney, West Virginia.[35] He had practiced law in Romney, West Virginia for 66 years.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Munske & Kerns 2004, p. 179.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Harris 1922, p. 161.
  3. ^ a b c d Pugh 2009, p. 275.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m American Historical Society 1923, p. 524.
  5. ^ Maxwell & Swisher 1897, p. 379.
  6. ^ Maxwell & Swisher 1897, p. 381.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Katzenberger 1897, p. 175.
  8. ^ a b c Columbian University Press 1893, p. 140.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Phi Delta Theta 1963, p. 216.
  10. ^ Columbian University Press 1893, p. 223.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai American Historical Society 1923, p. 525.
  12. ^ Katzenberger 1909, p. 191.
  13. ^ Maxwell & Swisher 1897, p. 497.
  14. ^ West Virginia Legislature 1916, p. 69.
  15. ^ Harris 1922, p. 814.
  16. ^ a b Virginia State Corporation Commission 1917, p. 242.
  17. ^ a b Poor 1922, p. 2087.
  18. ^ Camp 1916, p. 398.
  19. ^ Harris 1922, p. 341.
  20. ^ Munske & Kerns 2004, p. 180.
  21. ^ Harris 1922, p. 176.
  22. ^ Harris 1922, p. 178.
  23. ^ Harris 1922, p. 214.
  24. ^ Harris 1922, p. 204.
  25. ^ West Virginia Department of Agriculture 1918, p. 36.
  26. ^ a b West Virginia Department of Agriculture 1918, p. 65.
  27. ^ "Marriage Record Detail: Joshua Soule Zimmerman", West Virginia Vital Research Records (West Virginia Division of Culture and History), retrieved July 6, 2013 
  28. ^ "Birth Record Detail: Mary E. Zimmerman", West Virginia Vital Research Records (West Virginia Division of Culture and History), retrieved July 6, 2013 
  29. ^ "Marriage Record Detail: Garnett Kerr Kump in Hampshire County, West Virginia", West Virginia Vital Research Records (West Virginia Division of Culture and History), retrieved July 6, 2013 
  30. ^ "Birth Record Detail: George Henry Zimmerman", West Virginia Vital Research Records (West Virginia Division of Culture and History), retrieved July 6, 2013 
  31. ^ a b c Cumberland Evening Times (August 20, 1946), "Miss Zimmerman Weds Texas Man", Cumberland Evening Times (Cumberland, Maryland), retrieved July 9, 2013 
  32. ^ "Marriage Record Detail: James Paris McCracken", West Virginia Vital Research Records (West Virginia Division of Culture and History), retrieved July 6, 2013 
  33. ^ "Birth Record Detail: Vance Zimmerman", West Virginia Vital Research Records (West Virginia Division of Culture and History), retrieved July 6, 2013 
  34. ^ "Marriage Record Detail: Vance Zimmerman", West Virginia Vital Research Records (West Virginia Division of Culture and History), retrieved July 6, 2013 
  35. ^ a b "Indian Mound Cemetery: Hampshire County's Most Historic Cemetery - List of Interments", HistoricHampshire.org (HistoricHampshire.org, Charles C. Hall), retrieved July 6, 2013 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

Media related to Joshua Soule Zimmerman at Wikimedia Commons