Joy MacPhail

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Joy MacPhail
MLA for Vancouver-Hastings
In office
1991–2005
Succeeded by Shane Simpson
Leader of the Opposition in British Columbia
In office
2001–2005
Preceded by Gordon Campbell
Succeeded by Carole James
Minister of Social Services of British Columbia
In office
September 15, 1993 – June 17, 1996
Premier Michael Harcourt, Glen Clark
Preceded by Joan Smallwood
Succeeded by Dennis Streifel
Minister of Health & Minister Responsible for Seniors of British Columbia
In office
June 17, 1996 – February 18, 1998
Premier Glen Clark
Preceded by Andrew Petter
Succeeded by Penny Priddy
Minister of Education, Skills and Training of British Columbia
In office
December 12, 1996 – January 6, 1997
Premier Glen Clark
Preceded by Moe Sihota
Succeeded by Paul Ramsey
Minister of Labour of British Columbia
In office
December 12, 1996 – January 6, 1997
Premier Glen Clark
Preceded by Moe Sihota
Succeeded by John Cashore
Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations of British Columbia
In office
February 18, 1998 – July 16, 1999
Premier Glen Clark
Preceded by Andrew Petter
Succeeded by Gordon Wilson
Deputy Premier of British Columbia
In office
February 29, 2000 – June 5, 2001
Premier Ujjal Dosanjh
Preceded by Lois Boone
Succeeded by Christy Clark
Minister of Labour of British Columbia
In office
February 29, 2000 – November 1, 2000
Premier Ujjal Dosanjh
Preceded by Joan Smallwood
Succeeded by Joan Smallwood
Minister of Education of British Columbia
In office
November 1, 2000 – June 5, 2001
Premier Ujjal Dosanjh
Preceded by Penny Priddy
Succeeded by Christy Clark
Personal details
Born Hamilton, Ontario
Political party New Democrat
Spouse(s) James Shavick
Residence Vancouver, British Columbia

Joy MacPhail is a former Canadian politician in British Columbia. A longtime member of the British Columbia New Democratic Party, she served as a Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) from 1991 to 2005 and as a Minister of the Crown from 1993–1999, and 2000-2001.

MacPhail was born in Hamilton, Ontario, but has lived in Vancouver for almost two decades. She studied economics at the University of Western Ontario, and later earned a degree in labour studies at the London School of Economics. She has one son.

MacPhail was first elected to the British Columbia Legislature in 1991 as the MLA for Vancouver-Hastings, and served in the cabinets of three NDP premiers. Under Premier Mike Harcourt, she served as Minister of Social Services from 1993 to 1996. Under Premier Glen Clark she served a short stint as Minister of Social Services, then as Minister of Health from 1996 to 1998. MacPhail's final cabinet position in the Clark government was as Minister of Finance from 1998 to 1999, when she quit the Clark government at a time that it was suffering from increasing dissent and scandal.

When Clark eventually quit the NDP leadership, MacPhail ran for NDP leader, but did not attract significant legislative caucus support. She withdrew when it became obvious that Ujjal Dosanjh had an insurmountable lead. Under Dosanjh, she was the Deputy Premier and served as Minister of Labour and later, Minister of Education.

The NDP suffered a massive electoral blow in the May 16, 2001 provincial election, winning only two seats--those of MacPhail and Environment Minister Jenny Kwan. MacPhail only held onto her seat by 409 votes. She had largely taken over leadership of the campaign when it became apparent that the NDP would not be reelected, and was widely credited with keeping the party from being swept out of the legislature altogether.

Exactly one month after the election, MacPhail was appointed as the party's interim leader. She was a harsh critic of the new BC Liberal Premier Gordon Campbell. Although the NDP was the only other party in the legislature, it was four seats short of official party status. Despite this, Assembly Speaker Claude Richmond ensured that the NDP was resourced as an opposition and she was recognized by the Speaker as the Leader of the Opposition.

MacPhail stepped down as leader in 2003 and was succeeded by Carole James. She remained as parliamentary leader of the NDP until her retirement from politics after the 2005 election.

Following her departure from politics, MacPhail married film and television producer James Shavick, and is currently a partner in his production firm Shavick Entertainment. She is a member of the board of OUTtv, a Canadian cable television station owned by Shavick Entertainment, and focused on the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities. She has also appeared as a member of political panels on "As It Happens" on CBC Radio.

External links[edit]