Joyce Marcus

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Joyce Marcus is a well-known American archaeologist, who has published extensively in the field of Latin American archaeological research. Her particular focus has been on the pre-Columbian cultures and civilizations of Mesoamerica, where much of her fieldwork has been concentrated on the Maya civilization and the cultures of southern-central Mexico in the Valley of Oaxaca and surrounds. Marcus has also conducted and published research into the Andean civilizations of pre-Columbian Peru.

Marcus obtained her Ph.D. in anthropology from Harvard in 1974.

As of 2007 Marcus is a professor in the Department of Anthropology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She also holds the position of Curator of Latin American Archaeology, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, and is the Elman R. Service Professor of Cultural Evolution.

In 1997 she was elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Major publications[edit]

  • Feinman, Gary M. and Joyce Marcus (editors) (1998) Archaic States. School of American Research Press, Santa Fe, NM.
  • Flannery, Kent V. and Joyce Marcus (editors) (1983) The Cloud People: Divergent Evolution of the Zapotec and Mixtec Civilizations. Academic Press, New York.
  • Flannery, Kent V. and Joyce Marcus (1994) Early Formative Pottery in the Valley of Oaxaca. Memoirs vol. 27. Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
  • Flannery, Kent V. and Joyce Marcus (2005) Excavations at San José Mogote 1: The Household Archaeology. Memoirs vol. 40. Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
  • Marcus, Joyce (1976) Emblem and State in the Classic Maya Lowlands: An Epigraphic Approach to Territorial Organization. Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C.
  • Marcus, Joyce (1992) Mesoamerican Writing Systems: Propaganda, Myth, and History in Four Ancient Civilizations. Princeton University Press, Princeton.
  • Marcus, Joyce (1998) Women's Ritual in Formative Oaxaca: Figurine-Making, Divination, Death and the Ancestors. Memoirs vol. 33. Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
  • Marcus, Joyce and Kent V. Flannery (1996) Zapotec Civilization: How Urban Society Evolved in Mexico's Oaxaca Valley. Thames and Hudson, New York.

External links[edit]