Juan Domingo de Borja y Doncel

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Juan Domingo de Borja y Doncel (b. circa 1357[1] - d. ?) was a Spanish noble from Aragonese Valencia in the town of Borja, Zaragoza. He held the title over the Señor de la Torre de Canals. He was a member of the prestigious House of Borja.

Biography[edit]

Juan Domingo made his fortune in Jativa where he was involved in local commerce, specifically in the sugar trade. He was son of Domingo I de Borja and Caterina whose family name is not known.[2]

On 2 February 1375, a Domingo de Borja, believed to be the father of Calixtus III testified in a document as a citizen of Játiva.[3]

In 1404, Juan Domingo was recorded as having been granted the title of Sobreguarda of the frontiers of the Kingdom of Castile by King Martin of Aragon[4]

In 1408, Domingo's son Alfonso de Borja y Cavanilles (future Pope Calixtus III) granted his father the power to collect the pension of a censor in Vall de Pego.[5]

Marriage and Descendants[edit]

Juan Domingo de Borja married Francina Llançol, also of Valencia, and the couple gave birth to one boy and four girls:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Juan Domingo de Borja". rootsweb.com. Roots Web. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  2. ^ Batllori, Miguel (1999). La familia de los Borjas [The Borja Family] (in Spanish). Volume 18 of Clave Historial. translated by Jerónimo Miguel (illustrated ed.). Madrid: Real Academia de la Historia. ISBN 8489512345. ISSN 2172-8356. Retrieved 25 February 2014. 
  3. ^ "Diario Borja: 1373-1381" (in Spanish). Diario Borja. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  4. ^ "Diario Borja: 1385-1408" (in Spanish). Diario Borja. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  5. ^ "Diario Borja: 1385-1408" (in Spanish). Diario Borja. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  6. ^ Sabatini, Raphael (9 Feb 2009). The Life of Cesare Borgia - Of France, Duke of Valentinois and Romagna, Prince of Andria and Venafri, Count of Dyois, Lord of Piombino, Camerino and Urbino, Gonfalonier and Captain-General of Holy Church: A History and Some Criticisms. Chapter 1: The Rise of the House of Borgia, Book I. Project Gutenburg. 

Florida International University (1998). "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church". Salvador Miranda. Retrieved April 9, 2012. 

External links[edit]