Juan Francisco Treviño

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Juan Francisco Treviño
25th Spanish Governor of New Mexico
In office
1675–1679
Preceded by Juan Durán de Miranda
Succeeded by Antonio de Otermin
Personal details
Profession Political

Juan Francisco Treviño was the governor of New Mexico from 1675 to 1679. His actions as governor caused the Pueblo Revolt against the Spanish settlers.

Biography[edit]

Juan Francisco Treviño was named governor of New Mexico in 1675. In this year, after he came to know of the existence of so-called Hombres Medicina (Medicine Men) in Pueblo Native American tribes (perhaps through Alonso de Posada's work attempting to eliminate them,[1]) he ordered his troops to burn the kivas and idols and arrest 47 Medicine Men who were then accused of witchcraft and killing several missionaries. Four Medicine Men were sentenced to death and the remaining whipped, imprisoned, and subjected to public humiliation.

When news of what was happening came to the Pueblo villages, some Native American leaders decided to march their men to Santa Fe and demand the release of detainees. Taking advantage of the fact that most of the governor's soldiers were off fighting the Apaches,[1][2][3] some seventy Native Amerindian warriors surrounded the governor's palace and stormed inside, capturing Treviño. Governor Treviño, frightened, in exchange for regaining his freedom, freed the remaining Pueblos, including one named Popé who, after his release, began planning a revolt against the Spanish (held on August 11, 1680).[1] Later, Treviño discovered news that the Amerindians were again building kivas, their age‑old ceremonial houses, and he promoted an investigation by the Franciscan missionaries. Their main objective was to destroy all homes built by Amerindians.

Probably in 1677, Trevino returned temporarily to Mexico City.[4]

After two years more of government in New Mexico, Juan Francisco de Treviño retired in 1679, being replaced by Antonio de Otermin in the government of this province. He did not know the Amerindian revolution against the Spanish was being planned during his administration, because of the subjugation and torture that he had perpetrated on American Indians.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Martínez Laínez, Fernando and Canales Torres, Carlos. Banderas lejanas: La exploración, conquista y defensa por parte de España del Territorio de los actuales Estados Unidos (Flags far: The exploration, conquest and defense by Spain of the Territory of the present United States). Page 138-139. Fourth edition: September 2009.
  2. ^ Cronología histórica.
  3. ^ Wandering Lizard: History Spain and the Pueblo de Los Pecos
  4. ^ New Mexico Office of the State Historian: Juan Francisco Treviño. by Grace Meredith. Retrieved in January 1, 2012, to 21:59 pm.

External links[edit]