Judge Anderson

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Judge Anderson

Judge Anderson in The Jesus Syndrome (art by Arthur Ranson
Publication information
Publisher IPC Media/Rebellion
First appearance 2000 AD #150 (February 1980)
Created by John Wagner
Brian Bolland
In-story information
Full name Cassandra Anderson

Judge Cassandra Anderson is a fictional character that started as a supporting player in the comic story Judge Dredd of 2000 AD and eventually rose in prominence and became the star of her own series, entitled Anderson: Psi-Division. She was created by writer John Wagner and artist Brian Bolland in 1980. Since 1988, Anderson has been written almost exclusively by Alan Grant, often working with artist Arthur Ranson.

Publication history[edit]

John Wagner created both Judge Death and Judge Anderson for the Judge Dredd story "Judge Death,"[1] the latter helping introduce the Psi-Judges, which were seen as a natural progression.[2] Brian Bolland based the character on Debbie Harry, "having recently drawn the singer into an advertisement for Forbidden Planet."[2]

Fictional character biography[edit]

Like the mythical Cassandra (the sister of Paris of Troy), Judge Anderson has psychic powers, chiefly telepathy and precognition.These abilities made her a member of Mega-City One's 'Psi Division' of Judges.

The character debuts during the first attack by Judge Death of the Dark Judges (a group of nihilistic undead Judges).[3] During this encounter, Anderson is possessed by Judge Death but then thwarts him by entombing herself in 'Boing,' a tough but porous material.[3] This lasts until the Dark Judges free her to release Judge Death, whereafter Anderson returns to active duty. She is instrumental in stopping this first attack by the Dark Judges, as well as several others. Due to being possessed and manipulated by them, Anderson develops a personal hatred of the Dark Judges.

Anderson is prominent in her Division and gains the respect of Dredd.[4] Unlike Dredd, she is a critic of the weaknesses in the judicial system of Mega-City One, has a sense of humor, forms personal friendships with fellow Judges, and permits herself doubt and remorse. Because her determination is similar to Dredd's, the two of them co-operate effectively on several missions.

In the story Engram[5]), Anderson regains memories of an abusive father and is shocked to learn that her Division was responsible for blocking them from her mind in the first place. This, together with the events of Leviathan's Farewell (concerning the suicide of her friend Judge Corey), Shamballa, The Jesus Syndrome and Childhood's End, prompts Anderson to resign from the judicial system.[6] After several adventures in outer space, she returns to Mega-City One. Dredd and Anderson are both considered veterans and regarded with awe by less experienced judges.

Later, after a deadly run-in with Judge Death, Anderson falls into a coma[7] and is infected with the psychic Half-Life virus. A team of Psi-Judges succeeded in rescuing Anderson, but the Half-Life passes to Judge Gistane, who is then tortured by the mad Judge Fauster. When Half-Life is unleashed on the city, causing a wave of mass murder, Anderson stops it.[8] Since waking from her coma, Anderson's age is now almost fifty. Being a Psi prevents her from using drugs and treatments Street Judges use to stay active despite aging. Because of this, Anderson expects to age beyond usefulness.

Stories[edit]

The following graphic stories feature Judge Anderson and were printed in 2000 AD and the Judge Dredd Megazine.

Anderson as main character[edit]

  • Judge Anderson:
    • “The Haunting,” written by Alan Grant, art by Kim Raymond, 2000 AD Annual 1984 (1983)
  • Judge Dredd:
    • City of the Damned,” written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, art by Steve Dillon (episodes 1, 5–7, 12–13), Ron Smith (2–3, 10, 14), Kim Raymond (4, 11) and Ian Gibson (8–9), in 2000 AD #393–406 (1984)
  • Judge Anderson:
    • “The Mind of Edward Bottlebum,” written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, art by Ian Gibson, Judge Dredd Annual 1985 (1984)
  • Anderson: Psi Division
    • “Revenge” (also known as “Four Dark Judges”), written by Alan Grant, art by Brett Ewins (epiosodes 1–7), Cliff Robinson (8–10, 12) and Robin Smith (11), in 2000 AD #416–427 (1985)
    • “A Fistful of Denimite,” written by Alan Grant, art by Ian Gibson, in Judge Dredd Annual 1986 (1985)
    • “The Possessed,” written by Alan Grant (as R. Clark), art by Brett Ewins, in 2000 AD #468–478 (1986)
    • “Golem,” written by Alan Grant, art by Enric Romero, in 2000 AD Annual 1987 (1986)
    • “Hour of the Wolf,” written by Alan Grant, art by Barry Kitson and Will Simpson, in 2000 AD #520–531 (1987)
    • “Dear Diary,” illustrated text story by Peter Milligan, art by Eddy Cant, in 2000 AD Annual 1988 (1987)
    • “A Soldier's Tale,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mike Collins,in Judge Dredd Annual 1988 (1987)
  • Judge Corey:
    • “Leviathan's Farewell,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mick Austin, in 2000 AD Sci–Fi Special 1988 (1988)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “Colin Wilson Block,” written by Alan Grant, art by Ian Gibson, in 2000 AD Winter Special 1988 (1988)
    • “Contact,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mark Farmer, in 2000 AD #607–609 (1988–1989)
    • “Beyond the Void,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mick Austin, in 2000 AD #612–613 (1989)
    • “Helios,” written by Alan Grant, art by David Roach, in 2000 AD #614–622 (1989)
    • “Triad,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in 2000 AD #635–644 (1989)
    • “The Prophet,” written by Alan Grant, art by David Roach, in 2000 AD #645–647 (1989)
    • “The Random Man,” written by Alan Grant, art by Carlos Ezquerra, in 2000 AD #657–659 (1989)
    • “Confessions of a She–Devil,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mick Austin, in 2000 AD Annual 1990 (1989)
    • “The Screaming Skull,” written by Alan Grant, art by David Roach, in 2000 AD #669–670 (1990)
  • Judge Dredd:
    • Necropolis,” written by John Wagner, art by Carlos Ezquerra, in 2000 AD #674–699 (1990)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “Shamballa,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in 2000 AD #700–711 (1990)
      • NB: story set before "Necropolis"
    • “Exorcise Duty,” illustrated text story by Andy Lanning/Dan Abnett, art by Anthony Williams (pencils) and Andy Lanning (inks), in Judge Dredd Annual 1991 (1990)
    • “Engram,” written by Alan Grant, art and co–plotting by David Roach, in 2000 AD #712–717 and #758–763 (1991)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “The Most Dangerous Game,” illustrated text story by Mark Millar, art by Dermot Power, in Judge Dredd Yearbook 1992 (1991)
    • “Blythe Spirit,” written by Alan Grant, art by David Roach, in the Judge Dredd Megazine (volume 2) #8 (1992)
    • “Reasons to Be Cheerful,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson (episode 1) and Siku (2), in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #10–11 (1992)
    • “The Witch? Report,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #14 (1992)
    • “Baby Talk,” written by Alan Grant and Tony Luke, art by Russel Fox, in Judge Dredd Mega Special 1992 (1992)
    • “George,” written by Alan Grant, art by Russell Fox, in Judge Dredd Yearbook 1993 (1992)
    • “The Jesus Syndrome,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #22–24 (1993)
    • “Childhood's End,” written by Alan Grant, art by Kev Walker, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #27–34 (1993)
  • Anderson: Psi:
    • “Voyage of the Seeker,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mark Wilkinson, on back of poster, free gift with Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #37 (1993)
    • “Postcards from the Edge,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson (episodes 1, 10–11), Tony Luke (2, 8), Charles Gillespie (3, 9), Arthur Ranson (4), Xuasus (5–7), in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #50–60 (1994)
    • “Postcard to Myself,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #73 (1995)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “Something Wicked,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson (episodes 1–3) and Charles Gillespie (4–7), in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #74–80 (1995)
    • “Satan,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 3) #1–7 (1995)
    • “The Protest,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 3) #14 (1996)
    • “Wonderwall,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1045–1049 (1997)
    • “Crusade,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1050–1061 (1997)
    • “Danse Macabre,” written by Alan Grant, art by Angel Unzueta, in 2000 AD #1076 (1998)
    • “Witch,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1087–1089 (1998)
    • “The Great Debate,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1090 (1998)
    • “Lawless,” written by Alan Grant, art by Trevor Hairsine, in 2000 AD #1102–1103 (1998)
  • Batman / Judge Dredd:
    • “Die Laughing,” written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, art by Glenn Fabry (book 1) and Jim Murray (book 2), 2-part mini-series (1998)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “Horror Story,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1132–1137 (1999)
    • “Semper Vi,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1140 (1999)
    • “R*Evolution,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in 2000 AD #1263–1272 (2001)
  • Judge Death:
    • “My Name is Death,” written by John Wagner, art by Frazer Irving, in 2000 AD #1289–1294 (2002)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “Half–Life,” written by Alan Grant and Tony Luke, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine #214–217 (2003)
    • “WMD,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine #221–226 (2004)
    • “Lock–in,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine #227–230 (2005)
    • “City of the Dead,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine #231–236 (2005)
    • “Lucid,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine #238–241 (2005)
    • “Big Robots,” written by Alan Grant, art by Dave Taylor, in Judge Dredd Megazine #257–264 (2007)
    • “Wiierd,” written by Alan Grant, art by Boo Cook, in Judge Dredd Megazine #272–276 (2008)
    • “Biophyle,” written by Alan Grant, art by Boo Cook, in Judge Dredd Megazine #277–278 (2008)
    • “House of Vyle,” written by Alan Grant, art by Boo Cook, in Judge Dredd Megazine #300–304 (2010)
  • Cadet Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “Big Girls Don't Cry,” written by Alan Grant, art by Patrick Goddard, in 2000 AD #2011 (2010)
    • “Teenage Kyx,” written by Alan Grant, art by Carlos Ezquerra, in 2000 AD #1734–1739 (2011)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “The Trip,” written by Alan Grant, art by Boo Cook, in Judge Dredd Megazine #309–313 (2011)
  • Cadet Anderson: Psi Division:
    • “Algol,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Yeowell, in 2000 AD #1780–1785 (2012)
  • Anderson: Psi Division:
    • "Stone Voices," written by Alan Grant, art by Boo Cook, in Judge Dredd Megazine #327–331 (2012)
    • "The Hades Trip," text story by George Pickett, in Judge Dredd Megazine #330 (2012)
  • Judge Dredd:
    • "The Pits," written by Alan Grant, art by Jon Davis-Hunt, in Judge Dredd Megazine #332 (2013)
  • Anderson: Psi Division
    • "Dead End," written by Alan Grant, art by Michael Dowling, in Judge Dredd Megazine #343–ongoing (2013)

Anderson as supporting character[edit]

  • Judge Dredd:
    • The Apocalypse War,” written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, art by Carlos Ezquerra, in 2000 AD #245–270 (1982)
    • “The Graveyard Shift” written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, art by Ron Smith, in 2000 AD #335–341 (1983)
    • “Tomb of the Judges,” written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, art by Ian Gibson, in 2000 AD #496–498 (1986)
    • “A Total Near Death Experience,” written by Alan Grant, art by Barry Kitson, in 2000 AD #629–630 (1989)
    • “And The Wind Cried,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mike Collins and Peter Ventner, in 2000 AD #637 (1989)
    • “Nightmares,” written by John Wagner, art by Steve Dillon, in 2000 AD #702–706 (1990)
    • “Death Aid,” written by Garth Ennis, art by Carlos Ezquerra, in 2000 AD #711–720 (1990–1991)
    • “Return of the Assassin,” written by John Wagner, art by Cam Kennedy, in 2000 AD #1141–1147 (1999)
    • “The Trial,” written by John Wagner, art by Simon Davis, in 2000 AD #1148–1150 (1999)
    • “Trial of Strength,” written by John Wagner, art by Neil Googe and Stephen Baskerville (inks 2), in 2000 AD #1151–1152 (1999)
    • “War Games,” written by John Wagner, art by Neil Googe (episode 1), Mike McMahon (2) and Charlie Adlard (3), Andy Clarke (pencils 4–5), Stephen Baskerville (inks 4–5), Colin Wilson (6–7), in 2000 AD #1153–1159 (1999)
    • “Endgame,” written by John Wagner, art by Charlie Adlard, in 2000 AD #1160–1164 (1999)
    • “Placebo,” written by Rufus Dog, art by John McCrea, in free supplement to 2000 AD #1405 (2004)
    • “Judgement,” written by Gordon Rennie, art by Ian Gibson, in 2000 AD #1523–1528 (2007)

Collected editions[edit]

The Judge Anderson, Anderson: Psi Division and Anderson: Psi stories (and also Judge Corey) are being collected in order of their original publication in a series of trade paperbacks:

  • Judge Anderson: The Psi Files volume 1, Rebellion Developments, 2009, ISBN 978-1-906735-22-7
    • “Revenge” (also known as “Four Dark Judges”), written by Alan Grant, art by Brett Ewins (epiosodes 1–7), Cliff Robinson (8–10, 12) and Robin Smith (11), in 2000 AD #416–427 (1985)
    • “The Possessed,” written by Alan Grant (as R. Clark), art by Brett Ewins, in 2000 AD #468–478 (1986)
    • “Hour of the Wolf,” written by Alan Grant, art by Barry Kitson and Will Simpson, in 2000 AD #520–531 (1987)
    • “Contact,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mark Farmer, in 2000 AD #607–609 (1988–1989)
    • “Beyond the Void,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mick Austin, in 2000 AD #612–613 (1989)
    • “Helios,” written by Alan Grant, art by David Roach, in 2000 AD #614–622 (1989)
    • Judge Corey: “Leviathan's Farewell,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mick Austin, in 2000 AD Sci–Fi Special 1988 (1988)
    • “Triad,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in 2000 AD #635–644 (1989)
    • “The Prophet,” written by Alan Grant, art by David Roach, in 2000 AD #645–647 (1989)
    • “The Random Man,” written by Alan Grant, art by Carlos Ezquerra, in 2000 AD #657–659 (1989)
    • “The Screaming Skull,” written by Alan Grant, art by David Roach, in 2000 AD #669–670 (1990)
    • “Engram,” written by Alan Grant, art and co–plotting by David Roach, in 2000 AD #712–717 and #758–763 (1991)
    • “The Haunting,” written by Alan Grant, art by Kim Raymond, 2000 AD Annual 1984 (1983)
  • Judge Anderson: The Psi Files volume 2, Rebellion Developments, 2012, ISBN 978-1-907992-95-7
    • "Shamballa", written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in 200AD #700-711 (1991)
    • "Blythe Spirit", written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine 2.08 (1992)
    • "Reasons to Be Cheerful", written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson and Siku, in Judge Dredd Megazine 2.10 - 2.11 (1992)
    • "The Which? Report", written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine 2.14 (1992)
    • "The Jesus Syndrome", written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine 2.22 - 2.24 (1993)
    • "Childhood's End", written by Alan Grant, art by Kevin Walker, in Judge Dredd Megazine 2.27 - 2.34 (1993-4)
    • “Voyage of the Seeker,” written by Alan Grant, art by Mark Wilkinson, on back of poster, free gift with Judge Dredd Megazine(vol. 2) #37 (1993)
    • “Postcards from the Edge,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson (episodes 1, 10–11), Tony Luke (2, 8), Charles Gillespie (3, 9), Arthur Ranson (4), Xuasus (5–7), in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #50–60 (1994)
    • “Postcard to Myself,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #73 (1995)
  • Judge Anderson: The Psi Files volume 3, Rebellion Developments, 2013, ISBN 978-1-78108-106-8
    • “Something Wicked,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson (episodes 1–3) and Charles Gillespie (4–7), in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 2) #74–80 (1995)
    • “Satan,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 3) #1–7 (1995)
    • “The Protest,” written by Alan Grant, art by Arthur Ranson, in Judge Dredd Megazine (vol. 3) #14 (1996)
    • “Wonderwall,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1045–1049 (1997)
    • “Crusade,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1050–1061 (1997)
    • “Danse Macabre,” written by Alan Grant, art by Angel Unzueta, in 2000 AD #1076 (1998)
    • “Witch,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1087–1089 (1998)
    • “The Great Debate,” written by Alan Grant, art by Steve Sampson, in 2000 AD #1090 (1998)
    • “Lawless,” written by Alan Grant, art by Trevor Hairsine, in 2000 AD #1102–1103 (1998)

The Judge Dredd stories are being collected, in order, in the series Judge Dredd: The Complete Case Files.

The Judge Death story "My Name Is Death" was reprinted in a graphic novel of the same title by Rebellion in 2005, ISBN 1-904265-73-1.

The story "R*Evolution" was reprinted in Shamballa, 2008, Rebellion, ISBN 978-1-905437-67-2 (as well as "Shamballa" and other stories in The Psi Files).

In other media[edit]

Novels[edit]

Mitchel Scanlon has written three Judge Anderson novels that have been published by Black Flame:

Anderson also appears as a supporting character in Judge Dredd novels:

Radio[edit]

Film[edit]

Actress Olivia Thirlby portrays Anderson in the 2012 film Dredd, as a Cadet Judge assigned to Dredd for her final assessment. In this film there is no Psi-Division, and Anderson is the only judge with psychic powers.

Computer game[edit]

Anderson appeared as a playable character in the Dredd Vs Death videogame in 2003.

Alternative comic versions[edit]

  • In 1994 DC Comics began publishing the short-lived title Judge Dredd – Legends of the Law, which featured their own version of Dredd.[9] Issues 1–4 featured Anderson as a cadet in a story called "The Organ Donors" (1994–1995), written by John Wagner and Alan Grant and illustrated by Brent Anderson and Jimmy Palmiotti. (Note that the Anderson in the Judge Dredd and Batman crossover stories is the original 2000 AD version of the character.)
  • In 2012 issue #2 of IDW Publishing's new Judge Dredd title included Anderson.

Awards[edit]

  • 1983: Won "Character Most Worthy of Own Title" Eagle Award
  • 1986: Nominated for "Favourite Supporting Character" Eagle Award

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ 2000 AD progs 149-151
  2. ^ a b Bishop 2007, page 70
  3. ^ a b 2000 AD #151
  4. ^ Judge Dredd Megazine vol. 3 #7
  5. ^ 2000 AD #712-717 and 758-763
  6. ^ Judge Dredd Megazine vol. 2 #34
  7. ^ 2000 AD #1294
  8. ^ Judge Dredd Megazine #214-236
  9. ^ Judge Dredd: Legends of the Law 2000 AD profile

References[edit]

External links[edit]