Judith V. Jordan

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Judith V. Jordan, Ph.D. is the co-director and a founding scholar of the Jean Baker Miller Institute [1][2] and co-director of the Institute's Working Connections Project. She is an attending psychologist at McLean Hospital and Assistant Professor of Psychology at the Harvard Medical School.[3] She is the recipient of the Massachusetts Psychology Associations' Career Achievement Award for "Outstanding Contributions to the Advancement of Psychology as a Science and a Profession and she received American Psychological Association's division 29 "distinguished psychologist award."[4] Dr. Jordan founded the Women's Studies Program and Women's Treatment Network at McLean Hospital and served as its first director.[5] She works as a psychotherapist, supervisor, teacher and consultant. She is the author of Relational-Cultural Therapy, co-author of Women's Growth in Connection, editor of Women's Growth in Diversity, The Complexity of Connection, the Power of Connection and has published many "Works in Progress" at Wellesley College as well as chapters and journal articles.[6][7] In addition, Dr. Jordan has written, lectured and conducted workshops nationally and internationally on the subjects of Relational-Cultural Theory, women's psychological development, empathy, mutuality, mutual empathy,[8] courage, shame, relational resilience, psychotherapy with women, a relational model of self, relational psychotherapy, gender issues in psychotherapy, relationships between women and men, the mother-daughter and mother-son relationships, special treatment programs for women and treating post-traumatic stress.[9]

Dr. Jordan’s work to develop and apply Relational-cultural therapy has served as a foundation for other scholars who have used this theory to explore the workplace,[10][11][12][13] education.[14][15][16][17] leadership [18] and entrepreneurship.[19]

Early life[edit]

Jordan grew up in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. In school, Jordan was excluded from safety patrol and shop class in middle school (privileges reserved for boys), but she was encouraged by her mother to fight the exclusion[20] Attended Abbot Academy (now Phillips Andover Academy) for high school because she had excellent grades and was not being challenged in her small rural school system . Jordan struggled with overwhelming homesickness and was shamed into believing that if she couldn’t “separate from home, [she] wouldn’t be able to succeed at anything” from school authorities [21] The school determined that Jordan should see a therapist, which was her initial introduction to the profession of psychology, and while this relationship was important, it did not deconstruct Jordan’s internalized belief that she had to separate from the people that she loved in order to “be successful”[22] Her interest in the power of connection found its roots in her own struggle to stay connected with important people in a world that told her that was a sign of "weakness". At Brown University she studied Psychology, and she got her Ph.D. from Harvard University, where she studied child development, clinical psychology and wrote her dissertation on how a competitive context interrupts girls' achievement behaviors. As a young faculty and clinician at Harvard Medical School, she began to write about the limitations of a "separate self" model of development and looked at the ways in which empathy provides an experiential sense of connection and compassion.


Education and Early Career[edit]

Dr Jordan received the award for outstanding achievement in her graduate class at Harvard University. She served as Director of Training and Director of the Women's treatment unit at McLean Hospital.

At Harvard, Jordan was told that her position in the doctoral program was “wasted on a woman,” a refrain repeated to other leaders in feminist psychology (including Carol Gilligan).[23] Jordan drew on her mother’s experience of being told to repeatedly to leave her M.D. program and excelled at Harvard, but “I really went underground in terms of any sense of competence and strength” until she joined Jean Baker Miller’s Monday night group.[24] In training, Jordan had been taught that the neutrality of the therapist was paramount to a patient’s healing, and that for a therapist to demonstrate any emotional response to a patient’s story or feelings would “have a bad impact on the patient”.[25] In her own practice, Jordan began to question if this distant neutrality was what may be adversely affecting patients. She “couldn’t bring herself to abandon her patients to please her supervisors,” and “the kind of therapy she did ‘felt deviant’” in this respect.[26] She began to meet with the women in Miller’s Monday night group, “’whom I respected tremendously, seeing that they were living with the same kind of uncomfortableness in this position, and that they were making the same kind of changes in what they were doing was incredibly validating.’”[27] The core group met every other week for ten years, talking openly and honestly about the work that they were doing, and the things they were learning from and with their patients, in Jean Baker Miller’s living room.[28]

Published works[edit]

  • Women's Growth in Connection (1991) with Miller, J., Kaplan, A., Stiver, I., and Surrey, J.
  • Women's Growth in Diversity (1997), editor.
  • A Relational-Cultural Model: Healing through Mutual Empathy (2001), Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 65(1) 92-103
  • A Relational-Cultural Perspective in Therapy (2002) In F. Kazlow (ed) Comprehensive handbook of psychotherapy (Vol 3, pp233–254).
  • The Complexity of Connection (2004) with Walker, M. and Hartling, L.
  • Recent Developments in Relational-Cultural Theory (2008) In Women And Therapy: A Feminist Quarterly, 31(2)(2/3/4).
  • Relational-Cultural Therapy (2010).
  • The Power of Connection (2010), editor.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jean Baker Miller Training Institute". Jbmti.org. 
  2. ^ Robb, C. (2007). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Pacador.
  3. ^ "Judith Jordan | Harvard Catalyst Profiles | Harvard Catalyst". Connects.catalyst.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2011-03-31. 
  4. ^ "Congratulations!". Apa.org. Retrieved 2011-03-31. 
  5. ^ "Jean Baker Miller Training Institute". Jbmti.org. Retrieved 2011-03-31. 
  6. ^ "Wellesley Centers for Women | Jordan, Judith, V. | by author | browse all | WCW". Wcwonline.org. Retrieved 2011-03-31. 
  7. ^ Robb, C. (2007). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Pacador.
  8. ^ Comstock, D.K., Hammer, T.R., Strentzsch, J., Cannon, K., Parsons, J., & Salazar II, G. (2008). Relational-cultural theory: A framework for bridging relational, multicultural, and social justice competencies. Journal of Counseling and Development, 86 (Summer), 279-287
  9. ^ "Jean Baker Miller Training Institute". Jbmti.org. Retrieved 2011-03-31. 
  10. ^ Fletcher, J.K. (1998). Relational practice: A feminist construction of work. Journal of Management Inquiry, 7(2), 163-186
  11. ^ Fletcher, J. K. (2001). Disappearing Acts: Gender, Power, and Relational Practice at Work. The MIT Press
  12. ^ Fletcher, J. K., & Ragins, B. R. (2007). Stone Center relational cultural theory. The handbook of mentoring at work: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 373-399). Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
  13. ^ Gersick, C. J. G., Barunek, J. M., & Dutton, J. E. (2000). Learning from academia: The importance of relationships in professional life. Academy of Management Journal, 43(6), 1026-1044
  14. ^ Beyene, T., Anglin, M., Sanchez, W., & Ballou, M. (Spring 2002). Mentoring and relational mutuality: Proteges perspectives. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, 41, 87-102
  15. ^ Liang, B., Tracy, A.J., Taylor, C.A., & Williams, L.M. (2002). Mentoring college-age women: A relational approach. American Journal of Community Psychology, 30(2), 271-285
  16. ^ Pololi, L., Conrad, P., Knight, S., & Carr, P. (2009). A study of the relational aspects of the culture of academic medicine. Academic Medicine, 84(1), 106-114
  17. ^ "Schwartz, H. L. (2009, May). Thankful learning: A grounded theory study of relational practice between master’s students and professors". 
  18. ^ Fletcher, J.K. (2004). The paradox of postheroic leadership: An essay on gender, power, and transformational change. The Leadership Quarterly, 15, 647-661
  19. ^ Buttner, E. H. (2001). Examining female entrepreneurs’ management styles: An analysis using a relational frame. Journal of Business Ethics, 29, 253-269
  20. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux., p.123
  21. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux., p.124
  22. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux., p.124
  23. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  24. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux., p.124-125
  25. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  26. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux., p.124-125
  27. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux., p.125
  28. ^ Robb, C. (2006). This changes everything: The relational revolution in psychology. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux., p.125

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