Judith Wallerstein

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Judith Wallerstein

Judith Wallerstein (December 27, 1921 – June 18, 2012) was a psychologist and researcher who created a 25-year study on the effects of divorce on the children involved.[1] [2] [3] From 1966 to 1992, Dr. Wallerstein was Senior Lecturer at the School of Social Welfare, University of California at Berkeley.

Criticism[edit]

Wallerstein's study exclusively examined middle-class Californians whose participants were pre-selected for therapy and psycho-analysis.

She influenced a California court on child relocation, and was criticized by Richard A. Gardner.[4]

Partial bibliography[edit]

  • Second Chances: Men, Women and Children a Decade After Divorce (with S Blakeslee)(Ticknor & Fields, 1989) [2]
  • The Good Marriage: How and Why Love Lasts (Houghton Mifflin, 1995)
  • Second Chances: Men, Women and Children a Decade After Divorce (Houghton Mifflin, 1996)
  • Surviving The Breakup: How Children And Parents Cope With Divorce (Harper Collins, 1996)
  • The Unexpected Legacy of Divorce: A 25-Year Landmark Study (Hyperion, 2000)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Woo, Elaine. "Psychologist Judith Wallerstein was described by Time magazine as the 'godmother of the backlash against divorce'; dies at age 90". latimes.com. Retrieved 2012-07-04. 
  2. ^ a b Second Chances: Men, Women and Children a Decade After Divorce JS Wallerstein, S Blakeslee - Ticknor & Fields; u.s. edition (January 1, 1989) ISBN 978-0-89919-648-0
  3. ^ DivorceInfo Synopsis
  4. ^ The Burgess Decision and the Wallerstein Brief, Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 26(3):425-431, 1998, http://www.fact.on.ca/Info/pas/gard98a.htm

External links[edit]