Judy Freudberg

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Judith Freudberg (July 12, 1949 – June 10, 2012) was an American TV writer. She was born in Memphis, Tennessee, and graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in speech and dramatic arts. In 1971, she started working on Sesame Street, two years after the show’s debut, as an assistant in the music department and became a writer for the children's television show in 1975. Judy worked on that show for 35 years and shared 17 daytime Emmys. One of the creators and developers of Elmo's World,[1] she served as head writer for that popular segment.

Freudberg collaborated with Tony Geiss on Sesame Street's first feature film, Sesame Street Presents Follow That Bird[2] as well as The Land Before Time[3] and An American Tail, two feature animation films directed by Don Bluth and executive produced by Steven Spielberg. She and Molly Boylan were nominated for a Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Writing in a Children's Special for the home video Elmo's World: Wild Wild West. For Sesame Street season 35, Judy co-wrote, with Lou Berger, the primetime special, Sesame Street Presents: The Street We Live On, which was nominated for an Emmy as Outstanding Children's Program.

She died on June 10, 2012 in Manhattan at age 62 from complications of a brain tumor.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Clash, Kevin; Mitchell, Louis Henry; Brozek, Gary (2006). My Life as a Furry Red Monster. Random House. p. 76. ISBN 0-7679-2375-8. Retrieved 26 January 2006. 
  2. ^ Hischak, Thomas (2008). The Oxford Companion to the American Musical. Oxford University Press. p. 254. ISBN 0-19-533533-3. Retrieved 26 January 2011. 
  3. ^ Maslen, Janet (18 November 1988). "Dinosaurs in Search of a Leafy Eden". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 January 2011. 
  4. ^ Slotnik, Daniel (16 June 2012). "Judy Freudberg, a Writer for ‘Sesame Street’ for 35 Years, Dies at 62". New York Times. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 

External links[edit]

Judy Freudberg at the Internet Movie Database