Julián Trujillo Largacha

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This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Trujillo and the second or maternal family name is Largacha.
Julián Trujillo
Julián Trujillo Largacha.jpg
12th President of the United States of Colombia
In office
April 1, 1878 – April 8, 1880
Preceded by Aquileo Parra
Succeeded by Rafael Núñez
13th President of the Sovereign State of Antioquia
In office
April 10, 1877 – December 19, 1877
Preceded by Manuel María Uribe Ángel
Succeeded by Daniel Aldana Manta
6th President of the Sovereign State of Cauca
In office
August 1, 1873 – August 1, 1875
Preceded by Tomás Cipriano de Mosquera
Succeeded by César Conto
3rd Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Colombia to Ecuador
In office
1870–1872
President Eustorgio Salgar Moreno
Preceded by Lino Ruiz
Succeeded by Antonio González Carazo
3rd President of the Sovereign State of Cauca
In office
August 15, 1867 – August 15, 1869
Preceded by Eliseo Payán
Succeeded by Andrés Cerón Serrano
Personal details
Born (1828-01-28)January 28, 1828
Popayán, Cauca, Colombia
Died July 18, 1883(1883-07-18) (aged 55)
Bogotá, Cundinamarca, Colombia
Nationality Colombian
Political party Liberal
Spouse(s) Dolores Carvajal Espinosa
Occupation Lawyer, soldier, politician
Religion Roman Catholic
Military service
Allegiance Colombia (Liberal Party)
Service/branch National Army of Colombia
Rank General
Commands Army Chief of Staff
Battles/wars Colombian Civil War (1860–1862)
Colombian Civil War of 1876

Julián Trujillo Largacha was a Colombian lawyer, statesman, General of the Army and President of Colombia from 1878 to 1880.[1]

Biographic data[edit]

Trujillo was born in Popayán, Cauca, on January 28, 1828.[1] He died in Bogotá, Cundinamarca, on July 18, 1883.[2]

Early life[edit]

Trujillo studied jurisprudence and graduated as a lawyer in 1849.[1]

Private life[edit]

Trujillo married Doña Dolores Thorny Carvajal, with whom he had 7 children.

Military career[edit]

In 1875, Trujillo enlisted in the army to defend the government of President Aquileo Parra against the conservative revolt. He participated in the battle of "Los Chancos", where the national army defeated the conservative upraise. He was ascended to the rank of General. Later, Trujillo leads the government’s forces in the successful seizure of Manizales, mayor stronghold of the conservative army. He is ascended to the rank of Great General.[1]

Political career[edit]

After Trujillo’s military victory in the seizure of Manizales, and the granting of amnesty to the conservative opponents, he is appointed as Military and Civilian Chief of the city of Manizales. In 1877, he is designated as President of the State of Antioquia, to replace the defeated and deposed Silverio Arango.[1]

The Presidency[edit]

In March, 1877, Trujillo is nominated as candidate for the liberal party by General Tomás Cipriano de Mosquera and Manuel Murillo Toro, one month before his arrival to the city of Medellín. This nomination was to honor the desires of General Rafael Núñez, who had expressed his wishes in a letter to General Fernando Ponce, dated October 28, 1876, in which he stated that General Trujillo was the most qualified to be President of Colombia.[3] Both wings of the liberal party, radicals and independents, united in support for the candidacy of Trujillo. He was elected president without opposition from the conservative party, who had been defeated in the war and decided not to take part in this presidential election.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Arismendi Posada, Ignacio; Gobernantes Colombianos; trans. Colombian Presidents; Interprint Editors Ltd.; Italgraf; Segunda Edición; Page 107; Bogotá, Colombia; 1983
  2. ^ Arismendi Posada, Ignacio; Gobernantes Colombianos; trans. Colombian Presidents; Interprint Editors Ltd.; Italgraf; Segunda Edición; Page 110; Bogotá, Colombia; 1983
  3. ^ a b Arismendi Posada, Ignacio; Gobernantes Colombianos; trans. Colombian Presidents; Interprint Editors Ltd.; Italgraf; Segunda Edición; Page 108; Bogotá, Colombia; 1983

External links[edit]