Julia Annas

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Julia Elizabeth Annas (born 1946)[1] is a British philosopher who has taught in the United States for the last quarter-century. She is Regents Professor of Philosophy at the University of Arizona.[2]

Biography[edit]

Annas graduated from Oxford University in 1968 with a B.A., and from Harvard University with an A.M. (1970) and a Ph.D. (1972).[3] She was a Fellow and Tutor at St Hugh's College, Oxford for 15 years and taught for a shorter time at Columbia University. She concentrates on the study of ancient Greek philosophy, including Ethics, Psychology and Epistemology. Her current research interests are in Platonic ethics. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1992.[1] She is the founder and former editor of the annual journal, Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy.[4] She is married to the Hume scholar, David Owen, also a professor of philosophy at the University of Arizona.

Philosophy[edit]

Julia Annas has advocated ethics based on character, building on ideas attributed to Greek philosopher, Aristotle and making them relevant for contemporary moral discourse.[5] She has argued that being virtuous involves “practical reasoning”[6] which can be compared to the “exercising of a practical skill”. Hence, she argues, rather than relating virtues to rules, principles, or an end goal, Annas says, first, people should ask how they can improve their moral “skills”.[6]

Major writings[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Intelligent Virtue (Oxford, 2011).
  • Plato: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2003).
  • Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2000).
  • Voices of Ancient Philosophy: An Introductory Reader (Oxford, 2000).
  • Platonic Ethics, Old and New (Cornell, 1999).
  • Annas, Julia (1993). The Morality of Happiness. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-509652-1.  (reprint 1995, ISBN 978-0-19-509652-1)
  • Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind (California, 1992).
  • The Modes of Scepticism (Cambridge, 1985), with Jonathan Barnes.
  • An Introduction to Plato's Republic (Oxford, 1981).
  • Aristotle's Metaphysics, Books M and N, translated with introduction and notes, (Oxford 1976).

Translations[edit]

Recent articles[edit]

  • "What are Plato’s “Middle” Dialogues in the Middle Of?" (Harvard University Press, 2002)
  • "Democritus and Eudaimonism" (Presocratic Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Alex Mourelatos, edited by Victor Caston and Daniel Graham, Ashgate, Aldershot, 2002)
  • "Aristotle and Kant on Morality and Practical Reasoning" (Aristotle, Kant & The Stoics,ed. S. Ergstrom and J. Whiting, Cambridge 1996)
  • "Virtue and Eudaimonism" (Virtue and Vice, ed. E. Paul, J. Jaul and F. Miller, Cambridge, 1998)
  • "Prudence and Morality in Ancient and Modern Ethics" (Ethics, January 1995)
  • "Epicurus on Agency" (Passions and Perceptions, Cambridge, 1993)
  • "The Good Life and the Good Lives of Others" (The Good Life and the Human Good, Cambridge, 1992)
  • "Plato the Sceptic" (Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Supp. Vol., 1992).
  • "Plato's Myths of Judgement" (Phronesis Vol. 27 No. 2, 1982; pp. 119-143).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Book of Members, 1780-2010: Chapter A". American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  2. ^ Julia Annas at the University of Arizona
  3. ^ "Julia Elizabeth Annas CV". University of Arizona. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  4. ^ Sedley, David (2001). Julia Annas, ed. Oxford studies in ancient philosophy, Volume 20. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-924225-2. 
  5. ^ A detailed account of her philosophical approach is set out in her 2011 book, Intelligent Virtue; an academic synopsis of the book is available here
  6. ^ a b For more on this, see Julia Annas’ article from ‘Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, 2008, accessible here

External links[edit]