Julio César Baldivieso

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Baldivieso and the second or maternal family name is Rico.
Julio César Baldivieso
Personal information
Full name Julio César Baldivieso Rico
Date of birth (1971-12-02) 2 December 1971 (age 43)
Place of birth Cochabamba, Bolivia
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Attacking Midfielder (retired)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1987–1991 Wilstermann
1992–1994 Bolívar
1994/'95–1995/'96 Newell's Old Boys 23 (5)
1996 Bolívar (loan)
1997–1998 Yokohama Marinos 54 (19)
1999 Wilstermann
1999 Barcelona SC 17 (4)
2000 Bolívar 14 (8)
2001 Cobreloa 12 (3)
2001–2002 Al-Nasr ? (?)
2002 Aurora 9 (3)
2002–2003 Al-Nasr ? (?)
2003 Aurora 9 (3)
2003–2004 Al-Wakra ? (?)
2004 Caracas 6 (1)
2005 Deportivo Quevedo 10 (2)
2006 The Strongest 6 (2)
2007–2008 Aurora 11 (0)
National team
1991–2005 Bolivia 85 (15)
Teams managed
2008–2009 Aurora
2011 Aurora
2012 Real Potosí
2012 Aurora
2013 Nacional Potosí
2013-2014 San José
2014 Wilstermann
2014 Universitario de Sucre
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 April 2008.

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 19 November 2006

Julio César Baldivieso Rico (born 2 December 1971 in Cochabamba) is a former Bolivian association football midfielder who played for the Bolivian national team in the 1994 World Cup and several Copa Américas. He is currently a football manager.

Club career[edit]

Nicknamed "El Emperador", Baldivieso began his career in his native Cochabamba playing for Wilstermann in 1987. His exquisite technique didn't go unnoticed and he signed with Bolivia's biggest football club, Bolívar in 1992. Thanks in part to the successful run with the national team, which qualified to the 1994 World Cup, he awoke the interest of several clubs outside Bolivia. After the World Cup, he transferred to Argentine team Newell's Old Boys from Rosario, where he played until the winter of 97. Subsequently, he joined J. League club Yokohama Marinos for a couple of years. As his career progressed, Baldivieso also exposed his talent in diverse leagues around the world; such is the case of Barcelona Sporting Club and Deportivo Quevedo in Ecuador, Cobreloa in Chile, Al-Nasr in Saudi Arabia, Al-Wakra in Qatar and Caracas in Venezuela. Towards the end of his career he returned to Bolivia and played for The Strongest, and later made his final run with Aurora on and off the field as he also managed the team. On 19 July 2009, being the Aurora's coach, he made debut his own 12-year old son, called Mauricio Baldivieso. At the end of the match he strongly criticized the referee and one opponent who made his son cry after a hard tackle. He quit Aurora 5 days later, after the club's board told him to pick between his job and his son. He also withdrew his son from the team.

Throughout his career, Baldivieso also played in 46 Copa Libertadores games altogether for three different teams and scored 11 goals.[1]

International career[edit]

Baldivieso made his debut for Bolivia on 14 June 1991 in a friendly match, losing 1–0 against Paraguay in Santa Cruz de la Sierra. He obtained a total number of 85 caps during his career, scoring fifteen goals. He played his last international match on 12 October 2005: a World Cup Qualifier against Peru in Tacna.

Club career statistics[edit]

[2]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Argentina League Cup League Cup Total
1994/95 Newell's Old Boys Primera División 12 4 12 4
1995/96 11 1 11 1
Bolivia League Cup League Cup Total
1996 Bolívar Liga Profesional
Japan League Emperor's Cup J. League Cup Total
1997 Yokohama Marinos J. League 1 22 9 2 0 5 1 29 10
1998 32 10 1 0 3 1 36 11
Bolivia League Cup League Cup Total
1999 Jorge Wilstermann Liga Profesional
Ecuador League Cup League Cup Total
1999 Barcelona Serie A 17 4 17 4
Bolivia League Cup League Cup Total
2000 Bolívar Liga Profesional 14 8 14 8
Chile League Copa Chile League Cup Total
2001 Cobreloa Primera División 12 3 12 3
Saudi Arabia League Crown Prince Cup League Cup Total
2001/02 Al-Nassr Professional League
2002/03
Bolivia League Cup League Cup Total
2003 Aurora Liga Profesional 9 3 9 3
Qatar League Emir Cup Sheikh Jassem Cup Total
2003/04 Al-Wakrah Stars League
Bolivia League Cup League Cup Total
2004 Aurora Liga Profesional 7 0 7 0
Venezuela League Copa Venezuela League Cup Total
2004/05 Caracas Primera División
2005/06
Bolivia League Cup League Cup Total
2006 The Strongest Liga Profesional 6 2 6 2
2007 Bolívar Liga Profesional 1 0 1 0
2008 Aurora Liga Profesional 11 0 11 0
Country Argentina 23 5 23 5
Bolivia 48 13 48 13
Japan 54 19 3 0 8 2 65 21
Ecuador 17 4 17 4
Chile 12 3 12 3
Saudi Arabia
Qatar
Venezuela
Total 154 44 3 0 8 2 165 46

International career statistics[edit]

[3]

Bolivia national team
Year Apps Goals
1991 5 0
1992 0 0
1993 15 0
1994 14 1
1995 8 1
1996 12 3
1997 9 2
1998 0 0
1999 0 0
2000 7 2
2001 8 5
2002 0 0
2003 3 1
2004 2 0
2005 2 0
Total 85 15

Personal[edit]

His son Mauricio Baldivieso is the youngest player to have played in a professional football match.[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]