Julius Grey

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Julius H. Grey (born 1948) is a Canadian lawyer and university professor. He is particularly known for his expertise in constitutional and human rights law.

Born in Wrocław, Poland, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971, a Bachelor of Civil Law degree in 1971, and a Master of Arts degree in 1973 from McGill University. Grey has been a member of the Quebec Bar and the Canadian Bar Association since 1974. Since 1976 he has been involved in numerous associations such as the Canadian Foundation for Individual Rights, serving as its president from 1985 to 1988. He was a professor of law at McGill University from 1979 until 1993.[citation needed]

Grey assisted in annulling a stipulation in the Charte de la langue française (Bill 101) that forbade the application of different languages on business signboards. Presently, French must merely be the predominant language, but others are allowed.[1]

Grey supported La servante écarlate by Margaret Atwood, the French version of The Handmaid's Tale, in the French version of Canada Reads, broadcast on Radio-Canada in 2004.

Grey defended the periodical La Presse Chinoise against a defamation lawsuit filed by Falun Gong. In 2005, the Superior Court of Quebec ruled that the articles published by the newspaper did not qualify as defamation. However, a subsequent ruling by the Quebec Court of Appeal in June 2008 reversed the lower court's ruling.[2]

Grey has publicly supported the New Democratic Party and Québec Solidaire. He was rumoured to be a future star candidate for the party in Montreal, following that party's successful capture of Outremont in a by-election by Thomas Mulcair on September 17, 2007;[3] however, he did not run in the 2008 or 2011 general elections. He is considering running in the next Canadian federal election.[4]

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