July 1965

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January – February – March – April – May – June – July – August – September – October – November – December

The following events occurred in July, 1965.

July 1, 1965 (Thursday)[edit]

July 2, 1965 (Friday)[edit]

  • Diplomatic relations are officially established between Greece and Nicaragua.
  • In the Wimbledon Men's Singles final, Roy Emerson defeats Fred Stolle 6–2, 6–4, 6–4.[4]
  • In Ramsgate, Kent, UK, one of the two-car yellow trains on the Tunnel Railway goes out of control while approaching the lower terminus and runs off the end of the rails before smashing into a building. The driver, 74-year-old Ernest Brown, is trapped in the cab and suffered pelvic injuries, while a number of passengers suffer minor injuries.[5] As a result, the owners decided to close down the attraction at the end of the season.

July 3, 1965 (Saturday)[edit]

July 4, 1965 (Sunday)[edit]

July 5, 1965 (Monday)[edit]

  • Maria Callas gives her last operatic performance, as Tosca at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden.

July 6, 1965 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 7, 1965 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 8, 1965 (Thursday)[edit]

July 9, 1965 (Friday)[edit]

July 10, 1965 (Saturday)[edit]

July 11, 1965 (Sunday)[edit]

July 12, 1965 (Monday)[edit]

July 13, 1965 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 14, 1965 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 15, 1965 (Thursday)[edit]

July 16, 1965 (Friday)[edit]

July 17, 1965 (Saturday)[edit]

July 18, 1965 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The first All-Africa Games open in Brazzaville, Congo.
  • Beginning of a 3-day period of extreme weather in Australia. Snow is recorded as far north as the Clark Range in Queensland, killing drought-weakened livestock. At the same time, extremely heavy rainfall in the North Coast turns drought into flood, Brisbane having its wettest-ever July day with 193.2 millimetres (7.6 in).

July 19, 1965 (Monday)[edit]

  • Vietnam War: The US Army Special Forces camp at Bu Dop, about 100 miles north of Saigon, comes under attack by the Viet Cong. Air strikes by two F-100s of the 481st Tactical Fighter Squadron were credited with "probably saving the camp that night".[15]
  • Born: Evelyn Glennie, Scottish percussionist, in Aberdeenshire

July 20, 1965 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • British cargo ship SS Napier runs aground off Bahia Potrero, Uruguay. It is eventually refloated on 18 August but declared a constructive total loss, and is scrapped a few months later.

July 21, 1965 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 22, 1965 (Thursday)[edit]

July 23, 1965 (Friday)[edit]

July 24, 1965 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Vietnam War: Four F-4C Phantoms escorting a bombing raid at Kang Chi are targeted by antiaircraft missiles, in the first such attack against American planes in the war. One is shot down and the other 3 sustain damage.
  • Freddie Mills, British former boxing champion, is found shot in the head in his car, parked in a cul-de-sac behind his nightclub in Longon; he dies in hospital the following day. An inquest later rules that he had committed suicide.[18]

July 25, 1965 (Sunday)[edit]

July 26, 1965 (Monday)[edit]

  • The Maldives receive full independence from Great Britain.
  • Australian TV station SAS broadcasts for the first time.[19]

July 27, 1965 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Edward Heath becomes Leader of the British Conservative Party.
  • American aircraft strike a surface-to-air missile site for the first time, attacking an SA-2 Guideline site in North Vietnam.[20]

July 28, 1965 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Vietnam War: U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announces his order to increase the number of United States troops in South Vietnam from 75,000 to 125,000, and to more than double the number of men drafted per month - from 17,000 to 35,000.

July 29, 1965 (Thursday)[edit]

July 30, 1965 (Friday)[edit]

July 31, 1965 (Saturday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, p. 47.
  2. ^ "RAF Search after Ship Sinks" The Times (London). Friday, 2 July 1965. (56363), col B, p. 11.
  3. ^ Howat, Gerald (1984). Walter Hammond. London: George Allen and Unwin. ISBN 0-04-796082-5. p. 141.
  4. ^ Barrett, John (2001). Wimbledon : The Official History of the Championships. London: CollinsWillow. p. 362. ISBN 0007117078. 
  5. ^ "Driver Trapped: Crash on the Tunnel Rail". East Kent Times (Ramsgate). 1965-07-07. 
  6. ^ "The Time Meddler". BBC. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  7. ^ Martin Luther King Jr and the Global Freedom Struggle. Accessed 21 December 2013
  8. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 314.
  9. ^ "An pioneer in the field of Madras"
  10. ^ http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bmarx.html
  11. ^ Haulman, Daniel L., One Hundred Years of Flight: USAF Chronology of Significant Air and Space Events, 1903-2002, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University Press, 2003, no ISBN number, p. 96.
  12. ^ Cowden, Jonathan A. Adlai Stevenson: a Retrospective. Princeton University Library Chronicle 2000 61(3): 322–359. ISSN 0032-8456
  13. ^ W. H. Greenleaf, The British Political Tradition. Volume II: The Ideological Heritage (London: Methuen, 1983), p. 320.
  14. ^ This Day in Aviation. Accessed 24 December 2013
  15. ^ Thomas E. Lowe (Summer 1975). The 481st TFS in Vietnam; A Personal Account 20 (2). American Aviation Historical Society. pp. 78–88. 
  16. ^ "Sir Alec steps down from top of Tory tree". BBC News. 22 July 1965. Retrieved 2008-01-15. 
  17. ^ Ludivine. "Microsoft Word - WM65.doc". Archived from the original on 2013-06-20. Retrieved 2013-06-18. 
  18. ^ "The ten strangest sporting deaths". The Observer. February 8, 2004. Retrieved 1 June 2009. 
  19. ^ "NETWORK TEN TURNS 40". Retrieved 2 December 2006. 
  20. ^ Nichols, CDR John B., and Barret Tillman, On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War Over Vietnam, Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-559-9, p. 153.
  21. ^ "J. K. Rowling's biography". J.K. Rowling's official website. Retrieved 17 March 2006.