Jump (Kris Kross song)

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"Jump"
Single by Kris Kross
from the album Totally Krossed Out
B-side "Lil' Boys in Da Hood"
Released February 6, 1992
Format 7" single, 12" maxi, CD single, CD maxi
Recorded 1992
Genre Hip hop, new jack swing
Length 3:17
(101.9 BPM)
Label So So Def Recordings
Ruffhouse Records
Columbia Records
Writer(s) Jermaine Dupri
Producer(s) Jermaine Dupri
Certification 2x Platinum (RIAA)
Kris Kross singles chronology
"Jump"
(1992)
"Warm It Up"
(1992)

"Jump" is a hit debut single by the American hip hop duo Kris Kross. It was released on February 6, 1992, as a single from their first studio album Totally Krossed Out. It achieved international success, topping charts in Switzerland, Australia, and the United States. Additionally, it was the third best-selling song in the US in 1992 with sales of 2,079,000 physical copies that year.[1]

History[edit]

Kris Kross's members were only 12 and 13 years old when they recorded their hit song. "Jump" was written and produced by Jermaine Dupri. "Jump" was the fastest selling single in fifteen years and stayed on top of the Billboard Hot 100 for eight weeks. Kris Kross's debut album Totally Krossed Out, which features "Jump", sold over four million copies. It also reached number one on the charts in Australia and New Zealand, and number 2 in the United Kingdom, held off the top by KWS' cover song "Please Don't Go". This song kept En Vogue's "My Lovin' (You're Never Gonna Get It)" and the Red Hot Chili Peppers' "Under The Bridge" from the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100, in which both songs peaked at number 2. At the time of its eight-week run, it was the longest running No. 1 since The Police's "Every Breath You Take" spent eight weeks at No. 1 in the summer of 1983.

The song samples The Honey Drippers' "Impeach the President", Ohio Players' "Funky Worm" and Jackson 5's "I Want You Back"; Kris Kross later toured Europe together with Michael Jackson. At the beginning of their song they dissed another kid group Another Bad Creation when Chris "Mac Daddy" Kelly said "don't try to compare us to another bad little fad".[citation needed] The original song's introduction contained a sample of Another Bad Creation's song "Playground" which was followed by a scratching sound giving the effect that their record was being taken off to play "Jump". This was soon removed due to copyright infringement.[citation needed]

It ranked number 75 on "VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of the 90's", and number two on their "Child Stars" Top 10 list. Most recently, the song (mislabeled as "Jump, Jump") was ranked at No. 34 on the list of the 100 Worst Songs Ever by Matthew Wilkening of AOL Radio, who tells the reader not to blame the kids of Kris Kross, but to look behind the curtain for Treach and Dupri, whom he labeled as "true villains".[2]

The song is used as part of a birthday card from American Greetings as of 2013.

Track listings[edit]

Charts[edit]

Chart successions[edit]

Preceded by
"Save the Best For Last" by Vanessa Williams
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
April 25, 1992 – June 13, 1992 (8 weeks)
Succeeded by
"I'll Be There" by Mariah Carey
Preceded by
"Rhythm is a Dancer" by Snap!
Eurochart Hot 100 number one single
May 23, 1992 – May 30, 1992 (2 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Knockin' on Heaven's Door" by Guns 'n' Roses
Preceded by
"Knockin' on Heaven's Door" by Guns 'n' Roses
Irish IRMA number one single
June 11, 1992 (1-week)
Succeeded by
"Abba-esque" by Erasure
Preceded by
"Tears in Heaven" by Eric Clapton
New Zealand RIANZ Swiss number-one single
June 12, 1992 – June 19, 1992 (2 weeks)
Succeeded by
"White Men Can't Jump" by Riff
Preceded by
"Save the Best For Last" by Vanessa Williams
Swiss number-one single
June 21, 1992 (1-week)
Succeeded by
"I'll Be There" by Mariah Carey
Preceded by
"Take It From Me" by Girlfriend
Australian ARIA number-one single
June 27, 1992 – July 11, 1992 (3 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Save the Best For Last" by Vanessa Williams

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paul Grein (May 8, 2013). "Week Ending May 5, 2013. Songs: Macklemore Pulls A Gaga". Yahoo Music (Chart Watch). Retrieved May 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ Wilkening, Matthew (September 11, 2010). "100 Worst Songs Ever – Part Four of Five". AOL Radio. Retrieved December 24, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Jump", in various singles charts Australian-charts.com (Retrieved December 15, 2007)
  4. ^ Belgian peak
  5. ^ Lwin, Nanda, Top 40 Hits: The Essential Chart Guide, 2000
  6. ^ Canada dance peak
  7. ^ German Wikipedia de:Kris Kross
  8. ^ Irish Singles Chart Irishcharts.ie (Retrieved December 15, 2007)
  9. ^ Italian Singles Chart Hit parade Italia (Retrieved June 1, 2008)
  10. ^ a b "Single top 100 over 1992" (pdf) (in Dutch). Top40. Retrieved April 14, 2010. 
  11. ^ UK Singles Chart Everyhit.com (Retrieved December 15, 2007)
  12. ^ a b c d Billboard Allmusic.com (Retrieved December 15, 2007)
  13. ^ 1992 Australian Singles Chart aria.com (Retrieved August 17, 2008)
  14. ^ 1992 Swiss Singles Chart Hitparade.ch (Retrieved August 17, 2008)
  15. ^ "Billboard Top 100 – 1992". Retrieved 2009-09-15. 
  16. ^ Geoff Mayfield (December 25, 1999). "1999 The Year in Music Totally '90s: Diary of a Decade – The listing of Top Pop Albums of the '90s & Hot 100 Singles of the '90s". Billboard. Retrieved October 15, 2010. 
  17. ^ a b French certifications, database Infodisc.fr (Retrieved December 15, 2007)
  18. ^ RIAA Gold & Platinum Searchable Database – Kris Kross singles. RIAA.com. Retrieved 2009-10-02.

External links[edit]