Jun Kamiwazumi

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Jun Kamiwazumi
Jun Kamiwazumi 1974.jpg
Jun Kamiwazumi in 1974
Medal record
Tennis
Competitor for  Japan
Summer Universiade
Silver 1967 Tokyo Singles
Gold 1970 Turin Doubles

Jun Kamiwazumi (神和住 純 Kamiwazumi Jun?) (born October 1, 1947) is a former Japan Davis Cup team player and tour tennis player.

A native of Ishikawa Prefecture, Kamiwazumi competed in sixteen Grand Slam tennis events between 1972 and 1976.[1] His best singles result was reaching the final 32 in the 1973 U.S. Open. His biggest grand slam tourney win was a first round defeat of No. 7 seed Stan Smith in the 1974 French Open. In doubles, he reached the round of 16 at the 1971 French Open, partnering compatriot Takahiro Sakai.

Kamiwazumi's biggest grand prix result was reaching the semi-finals in Hilversum in 1971, where despite going up two sets he lost the match to Ross Case. The following year at the same event he reached the quarter-finals, as he did in Cincinnati in 1972, Cincinnati and Hilversum both in 1974, and the Tokyo Outdoor in 1979. He finished with a tour win-loss singles record of 55 and 93 and a career-high ranking of World No. 78, which he reached in February, 1975. The right-handed resident of Tokyo best doubles results were reaching the final of the Osaka Grand Prix in 1973, partnering Aussie legend Ken Rosewall, as well as the Denver WCT final in 1974, partnering Mark Cox.

Kamiwazumi is tied for the most years played on the Japanese Davis Cup team, 12, a record he shares with Gouichi Motomura.[citation needed] He posted 12 wins against 8 losses in singles and went 8 and 8 in doubles, in a total of 20 ties played in. Kamiwazumi partnered Sakai against Mal Anderson and Geoff Masters in the 1972 Eastern Zone, Zone A final. Australia won the tie 4–1 in what turned out to be Japan's final appearance in a zonal final round until the format was changed to having a World Group, beginning in 1981.

After retirement Kamiwazumi became a tennis television commentator, university lecturer, television personality, and Japanese Davis Cup coach.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tennis – ATP World Tour – Tennis Players – Jun Kamiwazumi". ATP World Tour. Retrieved 2011-08-05. 

External links[edit]