Jungian cognitive functions

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In Carl Jung's theories of psychological type the cognitive functions (sometimes known as mental functions) are defined as different ways of perceiving and judging. They are defined as "thinking", "feeling", "sensation" and "intuition".

History[edit]

The model in which the four cognitive functions combine to form different psychological types was conceived by Jung in his pioneering work Psychological Types (1921, ISBN 0-691-09770-4). Jung also posited that the functions formed a hierarchy within a person's psychological dynamics — the most developed function is referred to as the "dominant", with the remaining three filling the roles as "auxiliary" and "inferior" functions.

Four Psychological Functions[edit]

The four basic psychological functions, thought (or intellect), feeling, sensation, and intuition are "basic functions" that can be briefly defined as follows:

  • Judging/rational functions:
  • Thinking
According to Jung, thinking is "that psychological function which, in accordance with its own laws, brings given presentations into conceptual connection." Jung also made distinction between active and passive thinking: "The term 'thinking' should, in my view, be confined to the linking up of representations by means of a concept, where, in other words, an act of judgment prevails, whether such act be the product of one's intention or not The faculty of directed thinking, I term intellect: the faculty of passive, or undirected, thinking, I term intellectual intuition." The former, active thought, is what Jung considered a 'judging function'.[1]
  • Feeling
Jung defined feeling as "primarily a process that takes place between the ego and a given content, a process, moreover, that imparts to the content a definite value in the sense of acceptance or rejection [...] Hence feeling is also a kind of judging, differing, however, from an intellectual judgment, in that it does not aim at establishing an intellectual connection but is solely concerned with the setting up of a subjective criterion of acceptance or rejection." [2] Also Jung made distinctions between feeling as a judging function, and emotions (affect): "Feeling is distinguished from affect by the fact that it gives rise to no perceptible physical innervations."[3]
  • Perceiving/irrational functions:
  • Sensation
Jung presented Sensation as "that psychological function which transmits a physical stimulus to perception. [...] not only to the outer stimuli, but also to the inner, i.e. to changes in the internal organs. Primarily, therefore, sensation is sense-perception, i.e. perception transmitted via the sense organs and 'bodily senses' (kinaesthetic, vaso-motor sensation, etc.)." Also, since the process of conscious perception is a psychological phenomenon representing a physical phenomenon, and not the physical phenomenon itself, he adds: "On the one hand, it is an element of presentation, since it transmits to the presenting function the perceived image of the outer object; on the other hand, it is an element of feeling, because through the perception of bodily changes it lends the character of affect to feeling."[4]
  • Intuition
Intuition is also presented as a basic psychological function as hunches and visions provide an alternative means of perception to sensation: "It is that psychological function which transmits perceptions in an unconscious way. Everything, whether outer or inner objects or their associations, can be the object of this perception. Intuition has this peculiar quality: it is neither sensation, nor feeling, nor intellectual conclusion, although it may appear in any of these forms."[5]

The four psychological functions may be subjugated to the control of consciousness, which can take two attitudes:

  • Extraversion: "a strong, if not exclusive, determination by the object."[6] Consciously, in an extravert, the four basic cognitive functions follow the extraverted 'general attitude of consciousness':
"Now, when the orientation to the object and to objective facts is so predominant that the most frequent and essential decisions and actions are determined, not by subjective values but by objective relations, one speaks of an extraverted attitude. When this is habitual, one speaks of an extraverted type. If a man so thinks, feels, and acts, in a word so lives, as to correspond directly with objective conditions and their claims, whether in a good sense or ill, he is extraverted." [7]
  • Introversion: "a turning inwards of the libido, whereby a negative relation of subject to object is expressed. Interest does not move towards the object, but recedes towards the subject."[8] Consciously, in an introvert, the four basic cognitive functions follow the introverted 'general attitude of consciousness'
"Everyone whose attitude is introverted thinks, feels, and acts in a way that clearly demonstrates that the subject is the chief factor of motivation while the object at most receives only a secondary value." [9]

The difference between extraversion and introversion comes from the source of the decisive factor in forming motivation and developing ideas, whether it is objective (i.e. the external environment) or subjective (the collective Unconscious, or "processes inherent in the psyche"[10]). When discussion function types, Jung ascribed movements of the libido in both directions for each function in each function type, but with one direction being that final judge.

Myers-Briggs[edit]

Myers' Dichotomies
Extraversion Introversion
Sensing iNtuition
Thinking Feeling
Judging Perceiving
Bold letters are used as shorthand labels

Isabel Myers, an early pioneer of psychometric testing whose ideas remain controversial within psychology, formalised these ideas and proposed that the mixture of types in an individual's personality could be measured through responses to a personality test she devised along with her mother, Katharine Cook Briggs, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. In this model, four "dichotomies" are defined, each labelled by two letters (one for each of the opposites in question), as shown by the emboldened letters in the table. Individuals' personalities fall into sixteen different categories depending on which side of each dichotomy they belong to, labelled by the four applicable letters (for example, an "ESFP" type is someone whose preferences are extraversion, sensing, feeling and perceiving).

Controversy over attitudes[edit]

Myers interpreted Jung as saying that the auxiliary, tertiary, and inferior functions are always in the opposite attitude of the dominant. In support of Myers' (and/or Briggs') interpretation, in one sentence Jung seems to state that the "three inferior" functions of an (extreme) extravert are introverted. The "most differentiated function is always employed in an extraverted way, whereas the inferior functions are introverted" (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 575).

Many, however, have found Jung's writing to be ambiguous, and those who study and follow Jung's theories (Jungians) are typically adamant that Myers is incorrect.[citation needed] Jungians interpret Jung as explicitly stating that the tertiary function is actually in the same attitude as the dominant, providing balance.[citation needed] More recently, typologists such as John Beebe and Linda Berens have introduced theoretical systems in which all people possess eight functions—equivalent to the four functions as defined by Jung and Myers but in each of the two possible attitudes—with the four in the opposite attitude to that measured known as the "shadow functions", residing largely in the unconscious.

There is controversy even within the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT), co-founded by Myers, regarding the attitude of the tertiary relative to the dominant. "The MBTI Qualifying Program", a binder given out during official training, puts the tertiary in the opposite attitude to the dominant on page 13; however, The Manual, which gives official instructions on how to use the test, has the tertiary in the same attitude on page 31. Charles Martin, former vice president of research at CAPT, writes the following on page 22 of the binder, "In what attitude is the tertiary? Isabel Myers read Jung to say that the auxiliary, tertiary, and inferior are all in the same attitude and opposite the dominant. Others (Harold Grant) read: tertiary is in the same attitude as the dominant."[citation needed]

To summarize Jung views, as discussed in Psychological Types, and maintained until his death,[11] Jung posited that each individual follows a 'general attitude of consciousness' where every conscious act is directed by the tendency to follow introversion for introverts, and extroversion for extroverts. Jung's definition of the general attitude was not limiting the individual from experiencing the opposing attitude, but offers the "decisive determination".[12] The primary, or most developed, differentiated, and conscious function, is entirely positioned in the service of the conscious attitude of introversion or extraversion, but even if all other functions can be conscious and made to follow the general attitude, they are of less differentiation and are hence strongly affected by the opposing attitude of the unconscious.[13][14] Later in the book, Jung describes the auxiliary function as being capable of some significant development or differentiation, if remains less differentiated that the primary.[15] His views on the primary and auxiliary functions both being of enough differentiation to be considered conscious and set aside with the primary as opposed to the most inferior two functions can be noted as early as Psychological Types.[16]

Different models[edit]

The tables below give different theorists' ideas about personality types in terms of "cognitive functions".

Carl Jung[edit]

Carl Jung developed the theory of cognitive processes in his book Psychological Types where he defined only four psychological functions which can take introverted or extraverted attitudes, as well a judging (rational) or perceiving (irrational) attitude determined by the primary function (judging if thinking or feeling, and perceiving if sensation or intuition).[17] He used the terms dominant, auxiliary, and inferior. Each individual follows a 'general attitude of consciousness' where the function is conscious. The more the function is conscious, the more it is introverted for introverts, and extroverted for extroverts.[18] The less differentiation and are hence strongly affected by the opposing attitude of the unconscious, and manifest in "happening" to the person and not under conscious control.[19][20][21] Therefore, the is a significant difference between Jung and the MBTI regarding the orientation of the functions.

Also, there is a difference between Jung and the MBTI regarding the designation of "inferior" function. While the MBTI clearly designates only the fourth function as the inferior, Jung uses a more flexible definition. "As a consequence of this one-sided development, one or more functions are necessarily retarded. These functions may properly be called inferior ..." (Jung, [1921] 1971:Def. Inferior Function, par. 763).

Table: the role of the four psychological functions (thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition) according to type [22][23]
General Attitude Type Extraverted Types
Rational/Irrational Attitude type Judging Types Perceiving Types
Function Type Extraverted Thinking

Types

Extraverted Feeling

Types

Extraverted Sensation

Types

Extraverted Intuitive

Types

Auxiliary Function Sensation Intuition Sensation Intuition Thinking Feeling Thinking Feeling
1. Primary:

Most differentiated in the extraverted consciousness.

Thinking Thinking Feeling Feeling Sensation Sensation Intuition Intuition
2. Auxiliary:

Less differentiated in the extraverted consciousness.

Sensation Intuition Sensation Intuition Thinking Feeling Thinking Feeling
3. Inferior:

Mostly undifferentiated. Can fall under the influence of introverted unconscious.

Intuition Sensation Intuition Sensation Feeling Thinking Feeling Thinking
4. Inferior:

Mostly undifferentiated. Can fall under the influence of introverted unconscious.

Feeling Feeling Thinking Thinking Intuition Intuition Sensation Sensation
General Attitude Type Introverted Types
Rational/Irrational Attitude type Judging Types Perceiving Types
Function Type Introverted Thinking
Types
Introverted Feeling
Types
Introverted Sensation
Types
Introverted Intuitive
Types
Auxiliary Function Sensation Intuition Sensation Intuition Thinking Feeling Thinking Feeling
1. Primary:

Most differentiated in the introverted consciousness.

Thinking Thinking Feeling Feeling Sensation Sensation Intuition Intuition
2. Auxiliary:

Less differentiated in the introverted consciousness.

Sensation Intuition Sensation Intuition Thinking Feeling Thinking Feeling
3. Inferior:

Mostly undifferentiated. Can fall under the influence of extraverted unconscious.

Intuition Sensation Intuition Sensation Feeling Thinking Feeling Thinking
4. Inferior:

Mostly undifferentiated. Can fall under the influence of extraverted unconscious.

Feeling Feeling Thinking Thinking Intuition Intuition Sensation Sensation

Isabel Myers[edit]

A diagram of the cognitive functions of each Myers-Briggs type. A type's background color represents its Dominant function, and its text color represents its Auxiliary function.

Isabel Myers created the original type table. In her table, diametrically opposite personality types (that is, those with no traits in common among the dichotomies) are separated by one block along diagonals.

Type
ISITEJ
ISIFEJ
INIFEJ
INITEJ
Dominant or first Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
Auxiliary or second Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
Tertiary or third Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
Inferior or fourth Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
Type
ISETIP
ISEFIP
INEFIP
INETIP
Dominant or first Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
Auxiliary or second Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
Tertiary or third Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
Inferior or fourth Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
Type
ESETIP
ESEFIP
ENEFIP
ENETIP
Dominant or first Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
Auxiliary or second Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
Tertiary or third Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
Inferior or fourth Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
Type
ESITEJ
ESIFEJ
ENIFEJ
ENITEJ
Dominant or first Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
Auxiliary or second Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
Tertiary or third Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
Inferior or fourth Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling

John Beebe[edit]

Though John Beebe has not published a type table, the format that Isabel Myers devised can also be applied to his theory. Beebe describes the different cognitive functions' role in the overall personality in terms of various mythic archetypes. Just as in Myers's table, personality types whose primary four functions are completely opposite are separated by one block along diagonals. The same does not apply to the four "shadow" functions, however.

Type
ISITEJ
ISIFEJ
INIFEJ
INITEJ
1st - Hero/Heroine Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
2nd - Good Parent Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
3rd - Puer/Puella Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
4th - Anima/Animus Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
5th - Opposing Personality Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
6th - Senex/Witch Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
7th - Trickster Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
8th - Daemon Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
Type
ISETIP
ISEFIP
INEFIP
INETIP
1st - Hero/Heroine Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
2nd - Good Parent Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
3rd - Puer/Puella Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
4th - Anima/Animus Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
5th - Opposing Personality Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
6th - Senex/Witch Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
7th - Trickster Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
8th - Daemon Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
Type
ESETIP
ESEFIP
ENEFIP
ENETIP
1st - Hero/Heroine Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
2nd - Good Parent Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
3rd - Puer/Puella Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
4th - Anima/Animus Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
5th - Opposing Personality Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
6th - Senex/Witch Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
7th - Trickster Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
8th - Daemon Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
Type
ESITEJ
ESIFEJ
ENIFEJ
ENITEJ
1st - Hero/Heroine Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
2nd - Good Parent Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
3rd - Puer/Puella Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
4th - Anima/Animus Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
5th - Opposing Personality Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
6th - Senex/Witch Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
7th - Trickster Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
8th - Daemon Extraverted Feelings Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling

Linda Berens[edit]

The layout of Linda Berens's type table is unique and her terminology differs from that of Beebe; however, the ordering of cognitive processes in her and Beebe's models are the same.

 
Engineer
Coordinator
Type
ENETIP
INETIP
ENITEJ
INITEJ
1st - Leading/Dominant Extraverted Intuition Introverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Introverted Intuition
2nd - Supporting/Overprotective Introverted Thinking Extraverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Extraverted Thinking
3rd - Relief/Unsettling Extraverted Feeling Introverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Introverted Feeling
4th - Aspirational/Projective Introverted Sensing Extraverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Extraverted Sensing
5th - Opposing/Backup Introverted Intuition Extraverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Extraverted Intuition
6th - Critical/Discovery Extraverted Thinking Introverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Introverted Thinking
7th - Deceiving/Comedic Introverted Feeling Extraverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Extraverted Feeling
8th - Devilish/Transformative Extraverted Sensing Introverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Introverted Sensing
 
Mediator
Guide
Type
ENEFIP
INEFIP
ENIFEJ
INIFEJ
1st - Leading/Dominant Extraverted Intuition Introverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Introverted Intuition
2nd - Supporting/Overprotective Introverted Feeling Extraverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Extraverted Feeling
3rd - Relief/Unsettling Extraverted Thinking Introverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Introverted Thinking
4th - Aspirational/Projective Introverted Sensing Extraverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Extraverted Sensing
5th - Opposing/Backup Introverted Intuition Extraverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Extraverted Intuition
6th - Critical/Discovery Extraverted Feeling Introverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Introverted Feeling
7th - Deceiving/Comedic Introverted Thinking Extraverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Extraverted Thinking
8th - Devilish/Transformative Extraverted Sensing Introverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Introverted Sensing
 
Expediator
Monitor
Type
ESETIP
ISETIP
ESITEJ
ISITEJ
1st - Leading/Dominant Extraverted Sensing Introverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Introverted Sensing
2nd - Supporting/Overprotective Introverted Thinking Extraverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Extraverted Thinking
3rd - Relief/Unsettling Extraverted Feeling Introverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Introverted Feeling
4th - Aspirational/Projective Introverted Intuition Extraverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Extraverted Intuition
5th - Opposing/Backup Introverted Sensing Extraverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Extraverted Sensing
6th - Critical/Discovery Extraverted Thinking Introverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Introverted Thinking
7th - Deceiving/Comedic Introverted Feeling Extraverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Extraverted Feeling
8th - Devilish/Transformative Extraverted Intuition Introverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Introverted Intuition
 
Improvisor
Conservator
Type
ESEFIP
ISEFIP
ESIFEJ
ISIFEJ
1st - Leading/Dominant Extraverted Sensing Introverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Introverted Sensing
2nd - Supporting/Overprotective Introverted Feeling Extraverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Extraverted Feeling
3rd - Relief/Unsettling Extraverted Thinking Introverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Introverted Thinking
4th - Aspirational/Projective Introverted Intuition Extraverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Extraverted Intuition
5th - Opposing/Backup Introverted Sensing Extraverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Extraverted Sensing
6th - Critical/Discovery Extraverted Feeling Introverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Introverted Feeling
7th - Deceiving/Comedic Introverted Thinking Extraverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Extraverted Thinking
8th - Devilish/Transformative Extraverted Intuition Introverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Introverted Intuition

Lenore Thomson[edit]

Lenore Thomson offers yet another model of the cognitive functions. In her book, Personality Type: An Owners Manual, Thomson advances a hypothesis of a modular relationship of the cognitive functions paralleling left-right brain lateralization. In this approach the Judging functions are in the front-left and back-right brain and the Perception functions in the back-left and front-right brain. The extraverted functions are in the front of the brain, while the introverted functions are in the back of the brain. The order of the cognitive functions are then determined not by an archetypal hierarchy (as supposed by Beebe) but by an innate brain lateralization preference.

Brain Types by Lenore Thomson
 
Front of Left Brain Front of Right Brain
Extraverted Thinking
&
Extraverted Feeling
Extraverted Intuition
&
Extraverted Sensing
Introverted Sensation
&
Introverted Intuition
Introverted Feeling
&
Introverted Thinking
Back of Left Brain Back of Right Brain
Type
ISITEJ
ISIFEJ
INIFEJ
INITEJ
Dominant Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
Secondary Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
Left-brain Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
  alternatives Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
Right-brain Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
  double agents Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
Tertiary Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
Inferior Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
Type
ISETIP
ISEFIP
INEFIP
INETIP
Dominant Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
Secondary Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
Right-brain Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
  alternatives Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
Left-brain Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
  double agents Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
Tertiary Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
Inferior Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
Type
ESETIP
ESEFIP
ENEFIP
ENETIP
Dominant Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
Secondary Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
Right-brain Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
  alternatives Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling
Left-brain Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
  double agents Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
Tertiary Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
Inferior Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
Type
ESITEJ
ESIFEJ
ENIFEJ
ENITEJ
Dominant Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking
Secondary Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition
Left-brain Extraverted Feeling Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Thinking Extraverted Feeling
  alternatives Introverted Intuition Introverted Intuition Introverted Sensing Introverted Sensing
Right-brain Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition
  double agents Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking
Tertiary Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Intuition Extraverted Sensing Extraverted Sensing
Inferior Introverted Feeling Introverted Thinking Introverted Thinking Introverted Feeling

Further reading[edit]

  • Jung, C.G. [1921] (1971). Psychological Types, Collected Works, Volume 6, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01813-8.
  • Myers, Isabel Myers [1980] (1995). Gifts Differing, Palo Alto, C.A.: Davies-Black Publishing. ISBN 0-89106-074-X.
  • Thompson, Henry L (1996). Jung's Function-Attitudes Explained, Watkinsville, GA.: Wormhole Publishing. ISBN 1-887-27801-0.
  • Nardi, Dario (2005). "8 Keys to Self-Leadership From Awareness To Action", Huntington Beach, CA :Unite Business Press. ISBN 0-971-93261-6.
  • Thomson, Lenore (1998). Personality Type: An Owners Manual, Boston & London: Shambhala Publications, Inc. ISBN 1-57062-987-0.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jung, Carl G. (1971). Psychological Types. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01813-8.: para.830
  2. ^ Jung, Carl G. (1971). Psychological Types. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01813-8.: para.724
  3. ^ Jung, Carl G. (1971). Psychological Types. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01813-8.: para.725
  4. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971: Chapter XI. Definitions)
  5. ^ Jung, Carl G. (1971). Psychological Types. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01813-8.: para.770
  6. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971: Chapter XI. Definitions)
  7. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971: p.418)
  8. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971: Chapter XI. Definitions)
  9. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971: Chapter XI. Definitions)
  10. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971: Chapter XI. Definitions)
  11. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971)
  12. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 418)
  13. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 427)
  14. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 515)
  15. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 514)
  16. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 517)
  17. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971)
  18. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 418)
  19. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 427)
  20. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 515)
  21. ^ (Jung, [1921] 1971:par. 514)
  22. ^ Jung, Carl G. (1971). Psychological Types. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01813-8.
  23. ^ Alshafey, Mohammad. "Psychological Types Quiz: A Tool for Learning about Jung's Psychological Functions." Psychological Types Quiz: A Tool for Learning about Jung's Psychological Functions. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Apr. 2015. <https://sites.google.com/site/jungpsychologicaltypes/home>.

External links[edit]