Futatsuryū Jun'ichi

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Futatsuryū Jun'ichi
双津竜 順一
Mono-ii.jpg
Personal information
Born Yamamoto Jun'ichi
1950
Hokkaidō, Japan
Died 2014
Tokyo, Japan
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight 172 kg (379 lb)
Career
Stable Tokitsukaze
Record 676-669-30
Debut September, 1963
Highest rank Komusubi (July, 1979)
Retired November, 1982
Championships 2 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
* Up to date as of September 2007.

Futatsuryū Jun'ichi (双津竜 順一, born February 28, 1950 as Jun'ichi Yamamoto, died August 12, 2014) was a sumo wrestler from Hokkaidō, Japan. After retirement he became the head coach of Tokitsukaze stable. Following his involvement in the hazing and death of trainee Takashi Saito, in October 2007 he became the first serving stablemaster to be dismissed by the Japan Sumo Association. In May 2009 he was sentenced to six years in prison.[1] He died on 12 August, 2014 of lung cancer.

Career[edit]

Born in Muroran, he made his professional debut in September 1963, at just 13 years of age. He reached the second highest jūryō division six years later in November 1969. He made his debut in the top makuuchi division in March 1972 but was demoted back to the second division a number of times. He was ranked in the top division for 29 tournaments in total, peaking at komusubi rank in July 1979. He was one of the heavier wrestlers in his time. His last top division tournament was in March 1980, but he continued to fight despite falling greatly in rank. He finished his career in the third highest makushita division.

Retirement from sumo[edit]

He retired from active competition in November 1982, becoming an elder of the Sumo Association under the name Nishikijima. After nearly twenty years working as an assistant coach at his old heya, he became head of the stable when former ōzeki Yutakayama reached the mandatory retirement age in August 2002, and adopted the Tokitsukaze name. He oversaw the promotion of Tokitenkū and Toyonoshima to the top division in July and September 2004. In May 2007 he criticised Asashōryū for injuring Toyonoshima during training, and visited his wrestler in the hospital. He also served as a shinpan, or judge during tournament matches.

Dismissal and trial[edit]

It was reported on 3 October 2007 that he would be dismissed from the Sumo Association over his involvement in hazing which allegedly contributed to the death of a young recruit at Tokitsukaze stable.[2] Junior wrestler Tokitaizan, whose real name was Takashi Saitō, collapsed and died in June after an intense training session called butsukari-geiko which reportedly lasted 30 minutes instead of the usual five. His death was originally put down to natural causes, but after Tokitsukaze pressed for a quick cremation the young wrestler's family insisted on an autopsy, which revealed the extent of his injuries.[3] Tokitsukaze admitted to police that the day before Tokitaizan's death he had hit him across the forehead with a beer bottle and allowed other wrestlers in the stable to strike Tokitaizan with a metal baseball bat.[2] It was also reported that Tokitsukaze failed to give Tokitaizan any aid and delayed calling an ambulance.[4] On October 5, the Sumo Association announced his dismissal.[5] They commented, "His actions were unbecoming as a stablemaster, he's outraged the public, and he's defiled the name of the Sumo Association."[6]

On 7 February 2008, he and three sumo wrestlers were arrested for accidental mortality.[7] Yamamoto admitted for the first time that Tokitaizan was tied to a pole and beaten for up to 20 minutes. He continued to deny the charges against him however, saying "it was not assault, it was discipline."[6] On 18 December 2008, three sumo wrestlers found guilty but received suspended sentences because they could not fight Yamamoto's commandment.[8] Yamamoto's trial began in February 2009.[9] On 29 May 2009, he was jailed for six years.[10] He immediately appealed the ruling and was released on bail. He then reportedly requested severance pay from the Sumo Association in the region of 20 million yen (200,000 USD).[11] The two sides reached an out-of-court settlement in January 2010, the details of which were not disclosed. His appeal was rejected in August 2011 and a five year jail term was finalized.[12]

Career record[edit]

Futatsuryū Jun'ichi[13]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1963 x x x x (Maezumo) (Maezumo)
1964 (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #23
2–5
 
West Jonokuchi #8
4–3
 
East Jonidan #97
3–4
 
East Jonidan #108
4–3
 
East Jonidan #75
5–2
 
1965 East Jonidan #26
2–5
 
West Jonidan #54
5–2
 
West Jonidan #19
4–3
 
East Sandanme #83
4–3
 
East Sandanme #67
4–3
 
West Sandanme #44
3–4
 
1966 East Sandanme #56
2–5
 
West Sandanme #75
5–2
 
East Sandanme #41
4–3
 
East Sandanme #20
5–2
 
West Makushita #82
3–4
 
East Makushita #93
4–3
 
1967 West Makushita #81
4–3
 
West Makushita #67
4–3
 
West Sandanme #6
4–3
 
West Makushita #54
5–2
 
West Makushita #35
2–5
 
East Makushita #44
2–5
 
1968 East Makushita #58
3–4
 
West Sandanme #8
6–1
 
West Makushita #42
6–1
 
West Makushita #25
4–3
 
West Makushita #20
4–3
 
West Makushita #14
3–4
 
1969 East Makushita #17
2–5
 
East Makushita #33
5–2
 
East Makushita #18
5–2
 
East Makushita #9
2–5
 
East Makushita #20
7–0
Champion

 
West Jūryō #13
10–5
 
1970 East Jūryō #7
8–7
 
West Jūryō #4
8–7
 
West Jūryō #2
5–10
 
West Jūryō #9
9–6
 
East Jūryō #5
6–9
 
West Jūryō #9
9–6
 
1971 West Jūryō #3
6–9
 
East Jūryō #10
12–3–P
 
East Jūryō #4
6–9
 
East Jūryō #6
7–8
 
East Jūryō #7
8–7
 
West Jūryō #3
9–6
 
1972 East Jūryō #1
10–5
 
East Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #4
6–9
 
West Maegashira #6
7–8
 
West Maegashira #8
7–8
 
East Maegashira #11
4–11
 
1973 East Jūryō #4
6–9
 
East Jūryō #10
9–6
 
West Jūryō #4
9–6
 
West Jūryō #1
9–6
 
East Maegashira #12
7–8
 
East Jūryō #2
5–10
 
1974 West Jūryō #7
8–7
 
West Jūryō #3
9–6
 
East Jūryō #1
5–10
 
East Jūryō #10
9–6
 
West Jūryō #2
7–8
 
East Jūryō #5
6–9
 
1975 East Jūryō #10
8–7
 
East Jūryō #9
8–7
 
West Jūryō #7
11–4
Champion

 
West Maegashira #13
4–11
 
West Jūryō #5
8–7
 
East Jūryō #3
12–3
Champion

 
1976 East Maegashira #11
11–4
 
East Maegashira #3
4–11
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #5
4–11
 
West Maegashira #10
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
1977 West Jūryō #9
8–7
 
West Jūryō #7
8–7
 
East Jūryō #6
8–7
 
East Jūryō #4
10–5
 
East Maegashira #12
9–6
 
East Maegashira #7
9–6
 
1978 East Maegashira #3
4–11
 
East Maegashira #9
9–6
 
East Maegashira #4
4–11
 
West Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #8
9–6
 
East Maegashira #4
5–10
 
1979 East Maegashira #9
7–8
 
West Maegashira #10
8–7
 
East Maegashira #7
10–5
 
East Komusubi #1
4–11
 
West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
West Maegashira #4
5–10
 
1980 West Maegashira #8
6–9
 
East Maegashira #13
3–4–8
 
West Jūryō #9
9–6
 
East Jūryō #6
7–8
 
East Jūryō #8
5–10
 
East Jūryō #12
8–7
 
1981 West Jūryō #7
6–9
 
West Jūryō #11
9–6
 
West Jūryō #5
4–11
 
West Jūryō #10
9–6
 
East Jūryō #7
6–9
 
West Jūryō #12
4–11
 
1982 East Makushita #7
3–4
 
West Makushita #12
4–3
 
West Makushita #8
3–4
 
West Makushita #15
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
East Makushita #50
5–2
 
West Makushita #32
Retired
1–6–0
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former stable master gets six years for young wrestler's hazing death". Japan Times. 30 May 2009. Retrieved 1 June 2009. 
  2. ^ a b "Stable master faces ax over wrestler's hazing death". Japan Times Online. 2007-10-03. Retrieved 2007-10-03. 
  3. ^ "Heavy hitters". The Economist. 2008-02-14. Retrieved 2008-07-18. 
  4. ^ "Neglect alleged in sumo death". Japan Times Online. 2007-10-01. Retrieved 2007-10-03. 
  5. ^ "Japan sumo boss fired over death". BBC. 2007-10-05. Retrieved 2008-01-28. 
  6. ^ a b Sumo Talk: Tokitsukaze
  7. ^ "Japanese sumo trainer arrested over death of wrestler". The Washington Post. 2008-02-07. Retrieved 2008-02-07. [dead link]
  8. ^ "Japan wrestlers convicted in death of sumo fellow". International Herald Tribune. 2008-12-18. Retrieved 2008-12-18. 
  9. ^ "Ex-stablemaster denies ordering assault". Japan Times. 13 February 2009. Retrieved 17 April 2009. 
  10. ^ "Sumo trainer jailed over killing". BBC News Online. 29 May 2009. Retrieved 1 June 2009. 
  11. ^ "Disgraced sumo trainer at centre of beating scandal requests severance pay". Associated Press. 4 June 2009. Retrieved 4 June 2009. 
  12. ^ "5-yr term on ex-sumo master over death of wrestler to be finalized". Mainichi Daily News. 31 August 2011. Archived from the original on 31 August 2011. 
  13. ^ "Futatsuryū Jun'ichi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-25. 

See also[edit]