Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2003

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Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2003
JESC 2003 logo.svg
Dates
Final date 15 November 2003
Host
Venue Forum Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Presenter(s) Camilla Ottesen,
Remee
Host broadcaster Danmarks Radio (DR)
Interval act Sugababes performing Hole in the Head,
Busted performing Crashed the Wedding
Participants
Number of entries 16
Debuting countries  Belarus
 Belgium
 Croatia
 Cyprus
 Denmark
 Greece
 Latvia
 Macedonia
 Malta
 Netherlands
 Norway
 Poland
 Romania
 Spain
 Sweden
 United Kingdom
Vote
Nul points None
Winning song  Croatia
"Ti si moja prva ljubav"
Junior Eurovision Song Contest
Wiki Eurovision Heart (Infobox).svg 2004►

The Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2003 was the first Eurovision Song Contest for young singers aged eight to fifteen. It was held on 15 November 2003, in Copenhagen, Denmark. With Camilla Ottesen and Remee as the presenters, the contest was won by the then eleven-year-old Dino Jelušić, who represented Croatia with his song "Ti si moja prva ljubav" (You are my first love) while second and third place went to Spain and the United Kingdom respectively.

It was the first Eurovision to be broadcast in the 16:9 widescreen format. It was also the first Eurovision Song Contest where a DVD of the contest would be released. It was decided that the country that won the contest would not necessarily host the next contest, in order to reduce the pressure on the contestants.

Participating countries[edit]

16 countries competed in the first edition of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest.[1] In an original press release for the contest, then entitled the "Eurovision Song Contest for Children", a draw was held to select 15 countries to take part in the inaugural contest, with Slovakian broadcaster Slovenská televízia (STV) and German broadcaster ARD being drawn to compete along with 13 other countries.[2] These countries would eventually be replaced by entries from Poland, Cyprus and Belarus, in their first ever Eurovision event.

The draw for the running order of the contest was held on 6 October, with Greece drawn to open the contest and the Netherlands drawn to close.[3]

The rights to broadcast the contest were also acquired by broadcasters in Finland (YLE), Kosovo (RTK), Serbia and Montenegro (RTS/RTCG), Estonia (ETV), Germany (KIKA) and Australia (SBS).[4]






















Results[edit]

Draw Country Language Artist Song English translation Place Points
01  Greece Greek Nicolas Ganopoulos "Fili gia panta" (Φίλοι για πάντα) Friends forever 8 53
02  Croatia Croatian Dino Jelušić "Ti si moja prva ljubav" You are my first love 1 134
03  Cyprus Greek Theodora Rafti "Mia efhi" (Μια ευχή) One wish 14 16
04  Belarus Belarusian Volha Satsiuk "Tantsuy" (Танцуй) Dance 4 103
05  Latvia Latvian Dzintars Čīča "Tu esi vasarā" You're in summer 9 37
06  Macedonia Macedonian Marija and Viktorija "Ti ne me poznavaš" (Ти не ме познаваш) You don't recognise me 12 19
07  Poland Polish Kasia Żurawik "Coś mnie nosi" Something makes me bustle about 16 3
08  Norway Norwegian 2U "Sinnsykt gal forelsket" Insane crazy in love 13 18
09  Spain Spanish Sergio "Desde el cielo" From heaven 2 125
10  Romania Romanian BUBU "Tobele sunt viaţa mea" Drums are my life 10 35
11  Belgium Dutch X!NK "De vriendschapsband" The bond of friendship 6 83
12  United Kingdom English Tom Morley "My Song for the World" 3 118
13  Denmark Danish Anne Gadegaard "Arabiens drøm" Arabia's dream 5 93
14  Sweden Swedish The Honeypies "Stoppa mig" Stop me 15 12
15  Malta English Sarah Harrison "Like a Star" 7 56
16  Netherlands Dutch Roel Felius "Mijn ogen zeggen alles" My eyes say everything 11 23

Interval acts[edit]

The half time entertainment was provided by two acts from the UK. Busted performed "Crashed the Wedding" but Charlie Simpson was absent due to illness. However, the following day he was present for a radio interview in the UK where it was implied by both himself, and the other band members, that this was in fact a lie. The real reason for his absence was that he hated Eurovision. The Sugababes performed "Hole in the Head".

Score sheet[edit]

Results
Total Score Greece Croatia Cyprus Belarus Latvia Macedonia Poland Norway Spain Romania Belgium United Kingdom Denmark Sweden Malta Netherlands
Contestants Greece 53 7 12 1 5 1 1 7 5 2 7 1 3 1
Croatia 134 10 8 10 8 12 10 12 2 12 8 8 8 8 8 10
Cyprus 16 12 1 3
Belarus 103 5 12 6 10 10 12 10 1 7 5 5 4 7 6 3
Latvia 37 5 8 4 3 3 1 3 1 3 6
Macedonia 19 10 2 1 2 4
Poland 3 3
Norway 18 1 3 2 5 3 4
Spain 125 8 8 10 6 12 8 8 6 8 10 12 6 6 10 7
Romania 35 4 5 2 5 2 6 6 5
Belgium 83 3 6 2 7 4 6 6 4 8 3 6 7 5 4 12
United Kingdom 118 7 4 7 12 7 3 7 5 10 10 4 12 10 12 8
Denmark 93 6 2 4 5 6 7 5 8 12 6 7 4 12 7 2
Sweden 12 1 2 3 5 1
Malta 56 2 3 3 4 1 4 7 4 1 10 10 2 5
Netherlands 23 1 4 2 12 2 2

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points each country awarded to another:

N. Contestant Voting nation
3 Croatia Macedonia, Norway, Romania
United Kingdom Belarus, Denmark, Malta
2 Belarus Croatia, Poland
Denmark Spain, Sweden
Spain Latvia, United Kingdom
1 Belgium Netherlands
Cyprus Greece
Greece Cyprus
Netherlands Belgium

Commentators[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2003". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  2. ^ "The first ever "Eurovision Song Contest for Children" is born". 21 November 2002. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  3. ^ "First ever Junior Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. 7 October 2003. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  4. ^ "The new Junior Eurovision Song Contest in high definition". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  5. ^ Zouboulakis, I. (1 November 2003). "Επιλογές / 21:00, ET1 "Eurovision Junior"" [TV choices / 21:00, ET1 "Eurovision Junior"]. To Vima (in Greek). p. 49. 
  6. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest". UKGameshows. Retrieved 2012-08-12. 
  7. ^ http://netello.fi/tv?MODULI_id=467344

External links[edit]

Artists' sites[edit]