Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009

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Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009
"For The Joy Of People"
JESC logo 2009.png
Dates
Final date 21 November 2009[1]
Host
Venue Palace of Sports, Kiev, Ukraine[1]
Presenter(s) Ani Lorak
Timur Miroshnychenko
Dmytro Borodin (Green Room)[2]
Director Sven Stojanovic[3]
Host broadcaster National Television Company of Ukraine (NTU)
Opening act Dance acts featuring perofmance of Karina Rudnycka & Yuriy Kuzynsky[3]
Interval act Ani Lorak[3]
Participants
Number of entries 13
Debuting countries None
Returning countries  Sweden
Withdrawing countries  Bulgaria
 Greece
 Lithuania
Vote
Voting system Citizens of each participating country vote by telephone and SMS message, which counts for 50%. Each country's 10 favourites are awarded 1 to 8, 10 and 12 points based on the number of votes. Results 1-5 are automatically displayed on-screen, then each country announces 6-8, 10 and 12 points. A jury in each country also has a 50% say in the outcome.
Nul points All countries get 12 points from start
Winning song  Netherlands
"Click Clack"
Junior Eurovision Song Contest
◄2008 Wiki Eurovision Heart (Infobox).svg 2010►

The Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009 was the seventh edition of Junior Eurovision Song Contest and took place in Kiev, Ukraine. It was scheduled for 21 November.[1] 13 countries were confirmed by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) to compete in the Contest.[4] The contest was won by Ralf Mackenbach for the Netherlands with the song "Click Clack". At the age of 14, he is the oldest person to win the Junior Eurovision Song Contest in its 7 year History. Luara Hayrapetyan achieved Armenia another second place. Ekaterina Ryabova also took second place for Russia.

Location[edit]

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) invited broadcasters to bid for the rights to host the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009; three bids were received from Belarus, Serbia, and Ukraine.[5] TV4 of Sweden had originally sent in a bid during summer 2007, but soon withdrew its bid after deciding to completely withdraw from the contest.[6] After deliberations by the EBU, National Television Company of Ukraine was granted the rights to the 2009 contest and will host it in Kiev.[7] Ukraine also hosted the Eurovision Song Contest 2013 at the same venue.

On 12 November 2009 Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Ivan Vasiunyk declared that the contest would not be postponed; (earlier) Party of Regions member of parliament Hanna Herman had called on Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko to cancel the song contest because of the 2009 flu pandemic in Ukraine.[8]

Both Prime Minister Tymoshenko and President of Ukraine Viktor Yushchenko were present during the final; Tymoshenko was also present and speeched during the opening ceremony on 16 November 2009.[9]

[edit]

Logo of the contest titled "Tree of life" is based on the artwork "Sunflower of life" by Maria Primachenko, a well known Ukrainian folk art painter. Creative design of the show was based on the logo of the contest, works and ideas of Primachenko as well as on the concept of the show, titled "For the joy of people".[10]

Participants[edit]

The EBU announced the complete list of participating countries in the 2009 Contest on 8 June 2009. 13 countries competed in the contest: Armenia, Belarus, Belgium, Cyprus, Georgia, Macedonia, Malta, Netherlands, Romania, Russia, Serbia,Sweden and Ukraine.[4] Sweden returned after missing the contest, while Bulgaria, Greece and Lithuania withdrew from the Contest.[4]

Final[edit]

Each country decided their votes through a 50% jury and 50% televoting system which decided their top ten songs using the points 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1. Sweden have only 100% jury.

Draw Country Language Artist Song English translation Place Points
01  Sweden Swedish Mimmi Sandén "Du" You 6 68
02  Russia Russian Ekaterina Ryabova "Malenkiy prints" (Маленький принц) The little prince 2 116
03  Armenia Armenian Luara Hayrapetyan "Barcelona" (Բարսելոնա) - 2 116
04  Romania Romanian Ioana Anuța "Ai puterea în mâna ta - You have the power in your hand" 13 19
05  Serbia Serbian Ništa Lično "Onaj pravi" (Онаj прави) The right one 10 34
06  Georgia Georgian Group Princesses "Blue bird" 7 68
07  Netherlands Dutch, English Ralf Mackenbach "Click Clack" - 1 121
08  Cyprus Greek Rafaella Kosta "Thalassa, ilios, aeras, fotia"
(Θάλασσα, ήλιος, αέρας, φωτιά)
Sea, sun, air, fire 11 32
09  Malta English Francesca and Mikaela "Double Trouble" - 8 55
10  Ukraine Ukrainian Andranik Alexanyan "Try topoli, try surmy" (Три тополі, три сурми) Three poplars, three trumpets 5 89
11  Belgium Dutch Laura Omloop "Zo verliefd (Yodelo)" So in love 4 113
12  Belarus Russian Yuriy Demidovich "Volshebniy krolik" (Волшебный кролик) The magic rabbit 9 48
13  Macedonia Macedonian Sara Markoska "Za ljubovta" (За љубовта) For love 12 31
  • The rules says that the participants must sing in one of their national languages, however they are permitted to have a few lines in a different language - as seen in the winning entry.

Score sheet[edit]

Results
Total Score Sweden Russia Armenia Romania Serbia Georgia Netherlands Cyprus Malta Ukraine Belgium Belarus Macedonia
Contestants Sweden 68 4 5 2 5 3 6 2 5 4 7 5 8
Russia 116 6 10 8 10 7 7 10 7 12 8 12 7
Armenia 116 10 12 6 7 12 10 12 6 10 10 8 1
Romania 19 1 1 2 3
Serbia 34 2 1 3 3 2 3 3 1 4
Georgia 68 3 5 6 7 1 4 7 10 6 5 2
Netherlands 121 12 8 8 12 8 8 8 8 8 12 7 10
Cyprus 32 7 3 2 1 1 1 2 3
Malta 55 2 4 4 4 4 8 4 1 6 4 2
Ukraine 89 4 7 12 10 2 10 5 5 4 3 10 5
Belgium 113 8 10 7 5 12 6 12 6 12 5 6 12
Belarus 48 6 1 3 5 3 1 7 4 6
Macedonia 31 5 6 2 3 2 1
All countries automatically receive 12 points

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12 points received:

N. Contestant Voting nation
4 Belgium Macedonia, Malta, Netherlands, Serbia
3 Armenia Cyprus, Georgia, Russia
Netherlands Belgium, Romania, Sweden
2 Russia Belarus, Ukraine
1 Ukraine Armenia
  • All countries were given 12 points at the start of voting. This was so no country got nul points.

International broadcasts[edit]

 Azerbaijan 
Azerbaijan broadcast the contest live on İctimai TV.[11]
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 
Bosnia and Herzegovina broadcast the contest live on BHRT.[12]
 Australia
Australia broadcast the contest on SBS1 on April 14, 2010 [13]
Worldwide 
A live broadcast of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest was available worldwide via satellite through European streams such as TVRi, RIK Sat, RTS Sat and MKTV Sat. The official Junior Eurovision Song Contest website also provided a live stream without commentary via the peer to peer medium Octoshape.

Commentators[edit]

Spokespersons[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Ukrainian broadcaster NTU has officially confirmed the date of Junior Eurovision 2009". ESCKaz. 2009-02-20. Retrieved 2009-02-20. 
  2. ^ Siim, Jarmo (2009-10-22). "Hosts for Junior 2009 chosen!". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  3. ^ a b c "Names of presenters of Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009 are known". ESCKaz. 2009-10-19. Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  4. ^ a b c Bakkar, Sietse (2009-06-08). "13 countries to be represented at Junior 2009!". EBU. Retrieved 2009-06-08. 
  5. ^ Konstantopoulos, Fotis (2008-06-02). "Three bids for Junior Eurovision 2009". Oikotimes. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  6. ^ "TV4 is the third bidding broadcaster for JESC 2009". Oikotimes. 2007-09-14. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  7. ^ Floras, Stella (2008-06-06). "JESC - Ukraine: To host Junior Eurovision 2009". ESCToday. Retrieved 2008-06-18. 
  8. ^ Ukraine will not postpone Junior Eurovision 2009 over flu outbreak - official, Interfax-Ukraine (13 November 2009)
  9. ^ Events by themes: Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009, UNIAN (November 21, 2009)
  10. ^ "Logo and concept of Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009 have been presented". ESCKaz. 2009-08-11. Retrieved 2009-08-11. 
  11. ^ "İctimai Televiziya və Radio Yayımları Şirkətinin həftəlik proqramı" (in Azerbaijani). İctimai TV. Retrieved 22 November 2009.  (21 noyabr - Uşaq avroviziyası 2009)
  12. ^ "BHRT to air the 2009 Junior Eurovision". Oikotimes. 2009-11-12. Retrieved 22 November 2009. 
  13. ^ "SBS1 Schedule April 14, 2010". Retrieved 24 April 2010. 

External links[edit]