Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis

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Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis
Jurassic Park Operation Genesis Cover.jpg
Cover art for Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis
Developer(s) Blue Tongue Entertainment
Publisher(s) Universal Interactive
Konami
Distributor(s) Sega (Japanese PC Version)
Engine TOSHI
Platform(s) Windows
PlayStation 2
Xbox
Release date(s) Windows
  • JP July 31, 2003
  • NA March 10, 2003
  • PAL March 28, 2003
PlayStation 2
  • JP October 16, 2003
  • NA March 25, 2003
  • PAL March 28, 2003
Xbox
  • NA March 26, 2003
  • PAL March 28, 2003
Genre(s) Theme park simulation
Mode(s) Single-player
Distribution DVD-ROM (2x)
CD-ROM (1x)

Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis is a construction and management simulation video game for the PC, Xbox, and PlayStation 2 based on the novel and film series Jurassic Park. The main point of the game is to recreate Jurassic Park - building a 5 star theme park with dinosaurs, and turning John Hammond's dream into reality. In the park, the player builds paths, amenities for visitors such as food, restrooms, enclosures, and attractions. One must also keep the park safe and secure. The park can be populated with up to sixty dinosaurs, with twenty-five different species available from the three Jurassic Park films. The player can also add attractions similar to those seen in the films, such as the safari seen in the Jurassic Park film, and additional attractions like a balloon tour and several varieties of viewing platform.

While the PlayStation 2 version is fairly common, the PC/Xbox versions of the game are generally considered to be some of the rarest and most expensive titles for the system, with copies of the game often selling on eBay for upwards of $100.[citation needed]

Gameplay[edit]

The player's main objective is simple: create a theme park/zoo featuring dinosaurs, make it popular, and make it safe with a 5-star rating. The gameplay functions are very similar to the SimCity and Tycoon game models. It is necessary to build feeding stations where herbivores can get bales of plant feed, while carnivores are fed live cows or goats. However, herbivores become unhappy if they don't have enough trees around them or enough nearby dinosaur friends to socialize with. Likewise, carnivores have an innate desire to hunt other dinosaurs, so even a constant stream of livestock will not keep them happy.[1]

Players may also create dinosaurs; in order to create a dinosaur, a significant percentage of the particular dinosaur's DNA is needed. Fifty percent (50%) is needed in order to create a dinosaur; the higher the percentage of DNA, the longer that dinosaur will live unless it dies by means other than natural causes (which, in the game, is old age or malnutrition). To gain a dinosaur's DNA, the player must extract it through fossils or amber, higher quality specimens mean that more DNA is extracted.

The player may also dig for fossils using a fossil hunting team to dig in one of the nine dig sites positioned around the world to obtain DNA. There are various dig sites in which the player may search for fossils and each dig site contains fossils from three certain dinosaurs and some of the dinosaurs, like Brachiosaurus, are available in more than one dig site. The chance of finding fossils in the site depends on the quality of the site. There are 6 classifications on the quality of a dig site. These classifications are excellent, good, average, mediocre, poor, and exhausted (exhausted sites are not truly empty, as it is still possible to find fossils, amber and gems there, but findings happen rarely and the fossils and amber are often low quality). More dig teams can be purchased at increasing amounts of money. When a player's dig teams are excavating a site, they occasionally will come across various precious metals and stones which can be sold when collected and can help raise park funds.

Attractions help make the park popular, and increase its rating power and income when correctly configured. Attractions must be researched before they can be constructed, and include the Balloon Tour, Safari Adventure and Viewing Dome (The Viewing Vents and Viewing Platforms do not need to be researched.) The Safari Tour and Balloon Tour attractions also allow for the player to "take over" the ride for the purpose of park exploration and photography, but only when a person in the game is using it. The player may also observe the dinosaurs from the Viewing Dome, Viewing Vent, and Viewing Platform by selecting the "View" option after clicking on the building. Also, amentities are needed for visitors and some are requirable after researching the amentity.

Missions[edit]

A view of an enraged Carcharodontosaurus from a ranger helicopter

The game has 10 missions the player can complete. In some websites like IGN and GameSpot, early previews indicated that there were originally to be 12 missions. There are about three or four general types of missions, including taking photographs of dinosaurs to try to rack up a certain amount of points from the photos in a safari mission.

Site B[edit]

After all the missions are completed, a Site B option unlocks on the title page which allows the player to build an island without any fences or buildings for people, and no visitors are allowed (meaning no security buildings or ranger stations). Site B was designed to be more like Isla Sorna in The Lost World: Jurassic Park. In it, the player gets to place eight hatcheries and up to sixty dinosaurs (same as the park setting unless given a mod). The dinosaurs will be created and live out their lives on the island without diseases or the possibility of becoming stressed. As long as they have food, water and living space, the player can simply sit back and watch.

Fan modification[edit]

Thanks to the PC version's modular file structure, the game is very easy to modify with nothing more than a regular text editor. It is possible to create almost completely new missions, exercises, dinosaurs, and play options. The TML and DDS files are also editable to create different skins for the dinosaurs and visitors, with a popular modification being a Tyrannosaurus rex skin used to create a "super" T. rex known as Crusher.

Thanks to the open ended design, a small community of fans have come together to work to improve realism, unlock unreleased features, and design new features to be included. A group of people have formed the Community Expansion Project and the Genesis Expansion Project, which takes previous modifications and designs new ones for release in a patch for the overall community. The team's main aim is to recreate the dinosaurs to be as realistic as possible, mainly expanding and creating new behavior.[2] Two other modification sets are Jurassic Park Legacy's the Film-Canon Mod and Novel-Canon Mod. The "NCM" includes novel-based dinosaur skins and islands. The "FCM" includes film-based dinosaur skins, music, sounds, and islands.[3] From the release of the first expansions, which already contain a fair amount of changes, many others have appeared, more sophisticated, that make the game more realistic: one of the newest around is the "PMEP" (which fuses together excellent skins, new behaviors and a substantial improvement in the graphics, especially with the environment).

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings (PS2) 74.54%[4]
(PC) 72.81%[5]
(Xbox) 70.87%[6]
Metacritic (PS2) 75/100[7]
(PC) 72/100[8]
(Xbox) 69/100[9]
Review scores
Publication Score
Electronic Gaming Monthly 7/10[10]
Game Informer (PS2) 8.75/10[11]
(Xbox) 8.25/10[12]
GamePro 4.5/5 stars[13][14]
GameSpot (PC) 7.2/10[1]
7/10[15]
GameSpy 2/5 stars[16][17]
GameZone (PS2) 8/10[18]
(Xbox) 7.5/10[19]
(PC) 6.3/10[20]
IGN 5.9/10[21][22]
Official PlayStation Magazine (US) 4.5/5 stars[23]
Official Xbox Magazine 6/10[24]
PC Gamer US 70%[25]
Entertainment Weekly A−[26]

The game was met with positive to average reviews upon release. GameRankings and Metacritic gave it a score of 72.81% and 72 out of 100 for the PC version;[5][8] 74.54% and 75 out of 100 for the PlayStation 2 version;[4][7] and 70.87% and 69 out of 100 for the Xbox version.[6][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Colayco, Bob (March 20, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Review (PC)". GameSpot. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Modding Genesis". 
  3. ^ "Jurassic Park Legacy's Film-Canon Mod". 
  4. ^ a b "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis for PlayStation 2". GameRankings. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis for PC". GameRankings. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis for Xbox". GameRankings. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Critic Reviews for PlayStation 2". Metacritic. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Critic Reviews for PC". Metacritic. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Critic Reviews for Xbox". Metacritic. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis (Xbox)". Electronic Gaming Monthly (166): 132. April 2003. Archived from the original on January 31, 2004. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ Helgeson, Matt (April 2003). "Jurassic Park Operation Genesis (PS2; mislabeled as "PC")". Game Informer (120): 85. Archived from the original on May 28, 2007. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  12. ^ Kato, Matthew (April 2003). "Jurassic Park Operation Genesis (Xbox)". Game Informer (120): 90. Archived from the original on November 16, 2004. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  13. ^ Dan Elektro (March 28, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Review for PS2 on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on March 10, 2005. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  14. ^ Dan Elektro (March 28, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Review for Xbox on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on March 10, 2005. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  15. ^ Colayco, Bob (March 24, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Review". GameSpot. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  16. ^ Pavlacka, Adam (March 27, 2003). "GameSpy: Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis (PS2)". GameSpy. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  17. ^ Pavlacka, Adam (March 27, 2003). "GameSpy: Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis (Xbox)". GameSpy. Archived from the original on December 1, 2005. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  18. ^ Bedigian, Louis (March 29, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis - PS2 - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on February 2, 2009. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  19. ^ Code Cowboy (April 13, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis - XB - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on April 17, 2009. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  20. ^ Tha Wiz (March 27, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis - PC - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on February 19, 2009. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  21. ^ Boulding, Aaron (March 26, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis (PS2)". IGN. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  22. ^ Boulding, Aaron (March 25, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Review (Xbox)". IGN. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  23. ^ Rybicki, Joe (May 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine: 97. Archived from the original on May 16, 2004. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis". Official Xbox Magazine: 75. May 2003. 
  25. ^ "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis". PC Gamer: 104. April 2003. 
  26. ^ Robischon, Noah (May 2, 2003). "Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis Review". Entertainment Weekly (708): 79. Retrieved April 13, 2014. 

External links[edit]