Jutoupi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jutoupi
Chinese name 朱約信
Pinyin Zhū Yuēxìn (Mandarin)
Other name(s) Zhu Yuexin, Jutopi
Occupation Singer, Songwriter, Actor
Genre(s) Mandopop, Cantopop
Instrument(s) Guitar
Label(s) Rock Records

Jutoupi (sometimes Jutopi) is a Taiwanese pop artist who brought a new musical style to Asia in 1994.[1] Through his Funny Rap album series, Jutoupi focused on difficult topics, such as sex and political issues, through a mixture of Mandarin, Taiwanese, and English.[2] His subsequent switch to dance/aboriginal music mixes was not well received by his fan base.[2]

History[edit]

Jutoupi started his career as Zhu Yuexin.[2] Known as the "Bob Dylan of Taiwan," Jutoupi traveled around Taiwan to take part in social and political movements while accompanying himself on guitar.[2] In 1994, Jutoupi joined Rock Records,[2] a Taiwanese record label founded in 1980 by Sam and Johnny Duan. At Rock Records, Jutoupi changed his image by producing punk/rock style, fused with a range of Taiwanese and Western styles and adopting the confrontational name Jutoupi, a name that means pigheaded.[2]

Jutoupi's first record, Funny Rap I: You Sick Suck Nutz Psycho Mania Crazy taipei City (Rock Records/Mandala Works, Taiwan) (1994) was part of a set of three Funny Rap albums.[2] Jutoupi's Funny Rap focused on difficult topics, such as sex and political issues, through a mixture of Mandarin, Taiwanese, and English.[2] Funny Rap I was followed by Happy New Year (Mandala Works, Taiwan), ROC on Taiwan (Magic Stone, Taiwan), and Hexi de Yewan O A A (Rock Records/Magic Stone, Taiwan).[2] Hexi de Yewan represented a jump from rap music based on Taiwanese society to house music based on aborigines society.[2] Noted as the first mainstream album in Taiwan featuring aboriginal music, each song contains dance music mixed with music sampled from one tribe.[2] Jutoupi's subsequent switch to dance/aboriginal music mixes was not well received by his fan base.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Billboard (May 20, 1995) Magic Stone Music: Alternative Music Trailblazer. Page S19.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Broughton, Simon. (2000) The Rough Guide to World Music Taiwan Pop Music Artists Page 240. ISBN 1-85828-636-0